Contact

If you would like to contact me, feel free to send me an email to:

vladimir(at)foreverastudent.com 

or leave a comment under any of the articles. I reply to every comment and every email I get, but unfortunately for some reason, sometimes not all emails make it into my inbox. If I don't reply to you, please let me know by leaving a comment at the bottom of this page.

46 comments:

  1. Ахој,

    Одлично говориш српски и нисам приметио падежне грешке, које некад и ја правим, хаха. Једино што треба да исправиш је акценат, али опрашта ти се јер не живиш у средини где се говори српски језик. Само напред и све најбоље!

    Поздрав од студента кинеског језика. :)

    ReplyDelete
  2. Zdravo:) hvala lepo. Ne govorim svaki dan tako dobro. Drugar mi je pomogao da se pripremim :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Hello Vladimir. First of all, I would like to thank you for all inspiring videos. I am also from Slovakia, by the way from the same city as you. My question is : I study English and Russian languages and I am going to add on another Slavonic language which is probably going to be Polish or Croatian. Please, can you give me some advice related to studying 2 Slavic languages at the same time? Thank you

    ReplyDelete
  4. Hello Denis. Thank you for the comment. How well do you speak Russian? I personally don't think that it is a good idea to study two languages at the same time, if you don't know one of them very well, especially if they are both from the same language family. It doesn't really matter if they are Slavonic or not.

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thank you for your reply. I would say that my level is somewhere between intermediate and advanced. I still have a lot of work to do, there are some fields that I definitely have to work on but I can say that I feel comfortable in language already. I am just pondering about one thing: In learning Russian, I have created many associations with Czech and Slovak words and it has helped me. Could it be key to use this technique of comparison for all of the Slavonic languages or it is just too much? I know that you speak Serbo-Croatian, Russian, Polish and of course Slovak and Czech, so probably you have already found out something about this matter. Thank you )

    ReplyDelete
  6. Sure it's a good idea. The thing is that these languages are so similar that if you don't speak at least one of them well, you will mix them up, that's all.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Hi Vlad,
    i was at the conference in NYC on the previous weekend. and u was one of those who has impressed me...
    so my question is: i.m learning Chinese now, in a week my Greek classes will start and also and want to learn Spanish and Yiddish meanwhile. how do u think, it's too bad idea to learn them at once, isn't it?

    ReplyDelete
  8. Hello and thank you very much. Yes maybe it's a bit too much. Two should be more managable:)

    ReplyDelete
  9. Hello Vladimir,
    I'm from the Netherlands. I just saw your language video on youtube. You speak Dutch very well. It is a hard language with a difficult prononciation. I'm very impressed of all your language knowledge. I' m 17 years old and speak English, Dutch (of course), French, German and a bit Spanish. You have shown an amazing prestation with a lot of difficult languages. I have always been interested in languages, it is really impressive to see this!
    Succes and respect!

    Kind regards,
    Niels

    ReplyDelete
  10. @Niels

    Thank you very much Niels. Congratulations to your knowledge too.

    Lots of success to you too,

    Vladimir

    ReplyDelete
  11. Hi Vladimir! It's such a pleasure to discover your site and know about your wonderful gift for languages! I saw your video clip and enjoyed the sound of each of the 15 languages you speak. I'm of course most delighted to hear you speak (with much beauty of cadence and accuracy of tone) my native languages: Mandarin and Taiwanese. I'm a Chinese born in Manila, Philippines and my first language is Fookiense (which is to a large extent, Taiwanese). I'm currently learning French (on a self-study basis). I have a strong feeling that the resources in your blogs will inspire me in my pursuit of a personal dream: to be able to speak at least 4 more languages -- French, Spanish, Italian, and German -- in my lifetime. I look forward to more occasions to learn from you! Thanks!

    Sincerely,
    David

    ReplyDelete
  12. Hello David,

    thank you for the nice words. I hope you will find some useful information on my blog.

    Good luck with your studies:)

    Kind regards,

    Vladimir

    ReplyDelete
  13. Thanks for your response, Vladimir. Let me know if you're interested in packaging your work in book format. I'm partly an academic publisher for our university press and just let me know if you'd like me to facilitate your endeavor and your communication with the other presses.

    Warm best,
    David

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thank you very much for your kind offer David. I don't plan to publish anything for the moment, but I would like to in the future. I will keep your offer in mind. Thank you again.

    Best,
    Vladimir

    ReplyDelete
  15. You are amazing. Well i started to learn 9 languages i speak well Turkish Serbian Russian English Spanish Italian German and Portuguese and French but i want to improve them.Im from Russia.

    ReplyDelete
  16. Heya Vladimir!
    I've read and watched a bunch of language learning blogs and videos, concerning Chinese or in general, during the past few years (what a great way to procrastinate :D ). I sometimes feel that I've accumulated enough techniques, mental mindset tricks and scientific knowledge to efficiently pursue my language learning adventure for the rest of my life. Yet, I'm amazed how your contribution humbles me! I discovered much wisdom and useful tips in your videos and your blog, e.g. your article on how to learn 'simple' languages efficiently. I reckon that it's because you think outside the box or it's thanks to your experience and rational mind. Anyway, I'm totally in tune with your advises and wish you'll keep up bringing them!

    Well, a praising comment wouldn't be complete without a small request, would it? haha
    I watched your video on interviews. I was sticking with ChinesePod podcasts by default until now, but it has drawbacks (e.g. 大陆-specific words (and accent) give me a hard time in Taiwan ;] ).
    So the idea of interviews is very appealing to me, but I can't find scripts interviews in Chinese on the web. I've tried things like 採訪全文, but no luck. Any recommendations?

    Ben

    ReplyDelete
  17. Hi Ben,

    Thank you very much:)

    Yes, I have some recommendations. You're talking about written interviews, right?

    I used to read interviews on the 天下雜誌 and Cheers magazine websites. They reorganized them a bit now, so I can't find them just by looking at the websites, but try looking at the 人物專訪 columns.

    Hope it helps,

    Vladimir

    ReplyDelete
  18. Hi Vladimir... Great blog and videos. I've also learned several languages out of necessity and developed a passion for it. I now teach English in college and really agree with all your advice and recommendations about learning languages. I'm stealing your tip about avoiding "useless" words early on. Good one.

    -Tim

    ReplyDelete
  19. Hello Tim,

    thank you very much. I'm glad you like my website.

    Vladimir

    ReplyDelete
  20. Hi Vladimir! I just wanted to say that I'm very impressed by your pronunciation. I am a German and English native speaker and also speak Dutch, Spanish, a little French, can read Latin and am learning Mandarin, Italian, Swedish and Khmer (my life is a mess haha). Your Dutch pronunciation impressed me a lot because I know how hard it is to sound native in Dutch, especially considering you didn't learn it as a child like I did. Keep doing what you're doing! Hen hao!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you very much for the nice words Laura:)

      Delete
  21. Ahoj Vlado! Mas zkusenosti s audiodskolama? FSI, Glossika, serie "do ucha" atd? Zajimalo by me, pokud ano, zda nektery doporucujes k dennimu poslechu a drillu. Diky, zdravim! V.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ahoj. Trosku mam, ale nie velmi. Aky jazyk potrebujes? Pocuval som Chinesepod a Cantoneseclass101, tie sa mi velmi pacili. Glossika je tiez fajn, ale musis mat dobry zaklad inac je to velmi tazke. Inac najviac odporucam pocuvat youtuberov. Vsetko dobre.

      Delete
  22. Vlad,

    A huge pleasure to run across your good sound YouTubes -- which I'm going to be spending some time with over the next couple of weeks. This is about half refresher for me, but you add a good deal that is new to me, or adds depth to what I know, so I value your work a lot.

    Benjamin Martinex has the mot juste, up above: 找到了 :D
    感謝你 !


    Best wishes, and again, thanks.

    -dlj.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello David,

      I'm glad you find my videos and articles useful. I'll try to post more often. Good luck.

      Vladimir

      Delete
  23. I just wanted to say I'm inspired and impressed, not just by your language skills, which are obvious, but that you seem to be such an open-minded, patient and humble person. It seems you have friends from all over the world.
    I have a theory that when spending time abroad and really taking the time to learn a language you also learn about the culture and the people and become less prejudiced and less willing to put people into boxes. Guessing a multilingual childhood like yours also contributes to this. What do you think? But not to make it personal, I'm sure you met some intesting people in Berlin, do you think my theory fits any of them?
    Thanks for taking the time!
    Emily

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Emily,

      thank you for the nice comment.

      I don't know to be honest. I think it's very individual. Traveling and being raised in a multilingual environment is something that will make you realize very early on in your life that your ways are not necessarily the right ones and that in itself is very humbling. On the other hand, I think, that people who are naturally openminded like to travel, so I don't know which one is the reason and which one is the result:)

      Vladimir

      Delete
  24. Very good afternoon,

    I discovered your blog through your Youtube Channel a few days ago and I have already seen almost all your videos. You are a source of inspiration. Thank you very much for sharing your tips and experiences with us.

    Could I ask to you if you use online translators? Which one do you like the most?

    If you do not mind, I am interested in learning Japanese and/or Swedish and I wonder if you have any tip specifically for it, apart of the general tips of your blog and channel. Or perhaps you know some website or resource specially useful to learn them. I know that you do not speak Swedish (yet) but perhaps you know some youtube channel to practice its listening, since pronunciation is its hardest part.

    Again, thank you for your work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello and thank you very much for the nice comment. I'm glad you enjoy the channel and like the blog.

      I use google translate all the time. I think it is amazing. It would take me a while to describe why I like it, but simply put, it is a very effective tool which makes language learning a bit easier :)

      As for Japanese, I don't think I can give you any good advice unfortunately, because I'm not good enough in the language. For me, learning Japanese was a bit different, because I spoke Chinese well and Japanese has a lot of loanwords from Chinese.

      Maybe you've seen the video I made about listening and looking for foreign language youtubers to help you with your speaking. You can try looking for some Swedish ones.

      All the best,

      Vladimir

      Delete
  25. Ahoj,

    v první řadě díky za inspirativní videa na YT - mě osobně jsou velkým přínosem. Sama se teď učím španělštinu a tak se chci zeptat, máš nějakého španělsky mluvícího youtubera, kterého sleduješ? nebo nejake stranky, ze kterych ses spanelstinu ucil? klidne i anglicko-spanelske. Diky moc a keep on going!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ahoj. Dakujem velmi pekne. Vies co, na spanielcinu ani velmi nie. Ucil som sa ju dost davno, ked youtube este nebol taky popularny a vtedy som pocuval radio OSN, ktore je super, ale dost nudne a ked som sa minule snazil hladat nejakeho dobreho youtubera nic som nenasiel:/

      Delete
    2. Nevadí, zkusim se po necem podivat. Vlastne uz jen nekdo kdo mluvi vic nez dvema jazyky je pro me inspiraci, takze diky! :)

      Delete
  26. Привет Владо . Как дела ? Очень интересно и впечатляюще было увидеть человека владеющего столько языков.
    Ja som z Azerbajdzanu . Kedysi som ovladal slovencinu celkom na slusnej urovni len uz dlhe roky ju vobec nepouzivam. Je to dost smutne ked ovladas nejaky jazyk a nemas kde ho aplikovat . Preto nechcem studovat ziadny novy jazyk pokial nebudem si isty ze, budem mat kde ho pouzit. Staci zatial 5 : )

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ahoj:) Este stale ti ide dost dobre. Mam kamarata z Uzbekistanu, ktory studoval na Slovensku. Tiez hovoril skoro perfektne, ked tu studoval. Drzim palce:)

      Delete
  27. Hello Vladimir and Happy New Year!

    I really enjoy your blog posts and want to thank you for all of your language learning advice! In one post you mentioned a course you took in Italy well-designed for foreign students and I wanted to ask, what was the name of the school and do you know of any other similar programs? I would love to travel to learn a language (right now French) more authentically while being involved in a similar type of program.

    Ďakujem velmi pekne!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello and thank you:)

      It was a long time ago and I don't remember the details or the name, but it was a course for the Erazmus and other exchange students at the Centro linguistico at the Univeristy of Bologna, in Forli. If I remember correctly our classes were on the street which was perpendicular to the Main train station. It really was the only language course in my entire life where I really learned something.

      Delete
  28. Hello!

    I have a minor suggestion as regards starting to read books in a foreign language. Namely, what I've been doing recently is instead of simply reading a book in a foreign language, I concurrently read the same book in my native language (or any language I speak fluently) and in the language I am attempting to learn, one chapter at a time.

    That way I have a fresh memory of the context and can read the whole chapter without stopping to look up a word. I simply mark words I find interesting or important and write them down later on.

    Have you ever tried doing that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello,

      no, not really. I haven't tried it.

      Just by thinking about it briefly, I don't know how it could help you learn a language you don't speak very well yet though. If you're learning Russian and are at an intermediate level, you first read one chapter, say, in English and then the same chapter in Russian you'll know what the chapter is about but it will not help you much with understanding/learning new vocabulary which is the most important thing to do at these stages in my opinion.

      In a, say, 20 page chapter, there might be 100-150 words that you don't know at that learning stage and even if you read the chapter in English first, you just won't remember them all and won't be able to pair them up.

      I don't think reading the chapter in English first would be very effective then. Especially if you can dedicate only say 1 hour a day to your studies. Reading that chapter in English first will cost you a lot of time and even though it has its benefits, I don't see it being that useful compared to other techniques.

      But it's just my opinion.

      Vladimir

      Delete
  29. Hello Vlad. My name is john and i am from greece. I speak 5 languages at a decent level and i picked up romance languages together at the same time in the past and it was not a big deal and it went pretty well. I am thinking in starting serbian and russian at the same time as well. What's your take on this? I don't have a time issue which means i can dedicate at least 1 hour on each every day. Besides i like to challenge my self every once in a while and i feel it will be hell!! Any tips??

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello John. I never learned two languages at the same time and other polyglots don't recommend it either but you can try:)

      Delete
  30. My Ex, and former long-time partner, lists eight languages on her resume, English being the eighth. She carries an Oxford paperback dictionary with her, and the Scotch-taped cover serves really only as a folder for the much used pages. She is the only person I have ever heard use the rare word "chiliastic" correctly and in everyday conversation. (We were chatting about Gandhi or perhaps Mugabe, the latter of whom she called out accurately, decades ago when I still thought him an anti-colonialist liberator.)

    Among her languages, she lists Malian, Ugandan, and Kenyan Swahilis as three. I mentioned this quizzically to a friend, and he said, "Well, the Chinese might think of Spanish, Italian and Romanian as 'Romance' but we call them three different languages..."

    OK, if we can start thinking of Swahili as a family of languages, do you think there will come a point where we say "Chineses" rather than "Chinese"?

    Like everybody else I know the difference between Cantonese, "Mandarin," and Putonghua, and I'm vaguely aware of Fujianese and Shanghainese, which I think of as accents and some people call "dialects." But there's more to it than that, don't you think?

    What's your impression, being over there? My Chinese is still rudimentary, although I have done business in Taiwan (manufacturing bicycles for the Japanese market) and I've visited Hong Kong as a tourist a couple of times. "Next year, Beijing!"

    Still I've watched one bit of live input to Putonghua: 45 years ago I was an undergraduate at University of Toronto studying East Asian Studies, mostly classical philosophy and literature, and one of the department's professors was Professor "Sanskrit" Smith -- who commuted to China as a member of Chairman Mao's 47-odd member committee on language reform. Smith seems to have been a staunch Maoist, a fate I was able to avoid since I read the very good magazine "Problems of Communism." This later turned out to be financed by the US CIA, but it also turned out to have been extremely accurate in its reporting on the bogus Great Leap Forward and the calamitous Cultural Revolution.

    Anyway, Smith's activities kept Toronto up to date on language reform, and we all acquired a feeling for Putonghua as a work in progress -- somewhat parallel to the newly create "Filipino," which may or may not supplant Tagalog, and "Bahasa Indonesia" which the government and elite there intend to become the language of their diverse country.

    Today I study with a variety of computer and tape tutors, as well as Chinese friends whom I pester for help. This leaves me very much aware of differences in pronunciation even within urban and educated Beijing.

    How do the varieties of Chinese strike you, being over there?

    Best wishes, as always, Vladimir, and as usual thanks for your superb language materials!

    -dlj.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello and thank you for the nice comment.

      There are so many things you asked that I don't even know where to start my writing :)

      Maybe answering in bullets would be best:

      - in the West, the term Chinese often replaces the term Mandarin Chinese or Putonghua and I personally don't mind since it became such a widely used practice that it's simply the new standard now. I think it would be difficult to teach everyone that it's not entirely correct.
      - originally the term Chinese represented the group of languages that people from China were using (Mandarin, Cantonese, Hokkien, Hakka etc.) today, as written above it is virtually the same thing as Mandarin Chinese.
      - as far as I know Mandarin and Putonghua are the same thing. Maybe today, the Han dialect that was chosen to be Putonghua/Mandarin and Putonghua/Mandarin itself are a bit different, but the fact still remains that Mandarin and Putonghua are just two different names for the same language. If I remember correctly, the term Mandarin comes from the Portuguese word 'mandarim' which was the word Portuguese colonists used to call Chinese officials coming from the Chinese capital. The language they were speaking was thus 'Mandarin' (which is the same thing as Putonghua = ordinary language). Interestingly, the word mandarim has its roots in Sanskrit. Mantrin = counsellor, from Mantra = counsel.
      - Fuijianese and Shanghaiese are definitely not dialects or accents, they are languages.
      - Cantonese, Shanghaiese, Hokkien, Hakka, Mandarin etc. are as different as French and Romanian if not more - my opinion.
      - "What's your impression, being over there?" I'm not over there anymore:) I moved back more than 3 years ago.

      Have a nice day,

      Vladimir

      Delete
  31. This comment has been removed by the author.

    ReplyDelete
  32. Vladimir!
    My name is Amina and I am from Chechnya,Grozny. I am 22, native Chechen, speak Chechen,Russian,English and German a bit. Now studing French and Italian. As a linguist I am very interested in your studies. Writing to you to express my respect and invite you to our Republic! If you'll be passing by, or wanting to know some more about Chechen culture or language, please let me know! You are more than welcome =)
    My number is 8(928)890-95-40
    My mail is aminasadykova1995@mail.ru
    With respect,
    Amina😊

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Amina,

      thank you very much for the kind words :) If I ever pass through Grozny, I'll remember to send you a message.

      Good luck with your studies.

      Have a nice day,

      Vladimir

      Delete