My multilingual recording in 11 languages


Hello everyone. After a lot of consideration, I have decided to give it a shot and record myself trying to speak in the languages that I have learned. I was a bit afraid to do so, because while in general and in my experience people find polyglottery interesting, to some it might seem that people who do similar recordings or videos are show offs and attention seekers, which really wasn't my intention. I only wanted to join the community of people who have done so before and babble along in the languages that I speak for anyone who'd be interested in listening to my specific language combinations. I was hesitating for a long time and only until there were dozens of people out there with similar blogs, recordings or videos, I decided to give it a shot myself. This way I didn't feel like I was standing out too much and felt like just one of many.

Another reason for doing the recording was, that on my blog I post articles mostly about languages and language learning and doing a recording of this sort seemed like a nice way to let readers decide, whether my articles would be interesting for them to read. I wouldn't be very honest if I'd say that I didn't do the recording to gain some sort recognition, or try to compare myself to others, but I really didn't do it to show off.

I tried to do my best and in some cases I was actually surprised that I did not forget as much as I thought I'd have, in other cases I struggled a lot. I have watched many polyglot videos on youtube before, but I never thought that to do a similar recording would be such a difficult thing. It was really very hard and my respect to all of those who have done so so far.

I was sooo nervouuuuus recording this. I don't even know why. It's really a lot of pressure when I know that other people will have time to analyze every syllable I say. At the end I was getting more and more tired too and I am sure that I could have done a much better job with French or Spanish, but oh well. It was a long recording and it is natural to make mistakes I guess. Many thanks to all for listening.

Vladimir

Edit: 14.2.2012

After listening to the Russian part again I have to admit that it sounded cocky when I said that I learned to speak Russian that way only after a month in St.Petersburg. The thing is that before the recording I didn't speak Russian to anyone for more than a year and only rehearsed it for a bit before the recording itself and thought I would make a complete mess out of it. It somehow turned out much better than I expected which left me very surprised and happy so I lost it a bit at the end saying what I said. I know my Russian is full of mistakes and that my Russian stress is very often not where it is supposed to be.

Languages spoken in this recording:

English
Mandarin Chinese
Russian
Hungarian
German
Italian
Czech
Spanish
French
Portuguese (almost)
Slovak

Chinese:

So, where to start? I’ll start off with Chinese. Hello dear listeners, welcome to my Forever a student blog, I am Vladimir (Shu wentao), but most of my friends call me Taoge. I would like to talk to you about the content of my blog; I would like to introduce my blog. It is divided into two sections. The first section is in Chinese and is intended for my Taiwanese and Mainland Chinese friends/listeners, the second section will be in English and is intended for my western friends/listeners.

My biggest passions are languages, travel and music so I hope that on my blog I can share with you some issues related to these topics. I also hope to interview some of my friends in the future, as well as some really really amazing people, for instance westerners or my Japanese friends who speak Mandarin incredibly well. I think that maybe you might like their opinions, suggestions and stories.

To introduce myself, I come from Slovakia. Slovakia is a very small country in Central/Eastern Europe. Our population is four times smaller than the population of Taiwan, so we really are a very small country and my native language is Slovak, not English. I say this because a lot of Taiwanese directly talk to me in English on the street, even if it really isn’t my native language.

I think this was enough in order to introduce myself in Chinese, now I will speak in Russian.

Russian:

Hello to everyone. Now I would like to talk a little bit about my Russian. I started to study Russian in Slovakia and later attended a university in Russia, where I was studying Russian as a foreign language. Now of course, because I am from Slovakia, and my native language is Slovak, to study Russian is not as laborious as it is for my western friends, for instance, Americans or French, but in order to speak Russian perfectly (of course it’s impossible to speak Russian perfectly, but I mean at a reasonably high level) and learn a language so that you could for instance be able to understand the news or study at a university in Russia, that is something that is considerably more difficult and complicated even for Slovaks.

How I’ve learned Russian: in a very simple way. I began to listen to news in Russian at Radiosvoboda and Echo Moskvy and of course at the beginning I didn’t understand almost anything, but I slowly started to look up the words that I didn’t know, or at the time didn’t understand and step by step managed my way through these podcasts and through the newscasts from these radio stations to learn Russian to a level where I could travel around Russia. I have been in Russia in St.Petersburg only for one month and look, only after one month and listening to these newscasts I was able to reach this level in Russian. So this means if dear friends, you are from Poland, Slovakia, Czech republic or Croatia, in short, if your native language is a Slavic language, the best approach to learn Russian is to listen, listen and listen to audio and if you want to speak on a .. a little bit.. I don’t even know how to describe this level correctly, sort of a “universitarian” level, you have to listen to the news, because they use very good language.

For the Russian language part I think this is enough because there really is nothing more to say. Well of course there are many things that I could say but for such a short speech, this is absolutely enough.

Hungarian:

I will speak a little Hungarian now. Hungarian is my native language but, I am very sorry to say, that since I didn’t use it for a long time, I cannot speak it very fluently at the moment. When it comes to my education background, I only went to a Hungarian kindergarten. My elementary school, high school and university were all in Slovak, which means that in my opinion my vocabulary and my grammar are all terrible. The thing that I think is still nice is my pronunciation, because Hungarian is my native language and I think this is something that I will never forget, but I know that I make a lot of mistakes, but understand everything and I can read books. Whenever I went to Hungary, there was never any problem (I made a mistake here and said hyba instead of problema) I always spoke only Hungarian and as I said there were never any problems in communication. I think that if I was to go to Hungary now, within a month I would learn back everything that I knew, but unfortunately now I don’t have this possibility, so this has to wait.

German:

So I will now.. I would like to speak a little bit German now, and first of all I would like to apologize, because German is one of the languages (I used a wrong article. Should have been von den Sprachen) that I didn’t use for a very long time. I started to learn German when I was 14 and – and I did talk about this before – I made 12 mistakes in my first test, 16 mistakes actually and my mom decided back then to put me into.. I had private German tutoring. I was studying German with a woman that had lived in my city at that time and I am ashamed to say so, but I actually do have a German state exam, but as you can see and hear, my German is not so good anymore. Maybe the pronunciation is not so good, which makes me sad the most, because at 13 or 14… I spent one summer in Austria and after this summer I was, at least I think so, very fluent and I also think that at that time people – Germans and Austrians, they couldn’t tell whether I was a Slovak or not. Now, of course, I am very sad, because I have no possibilities to practice… I mean I do have the possibilities, but I do not make so much effort to speak German and naturally I forget a lot. I also do not know when will be the next time that I will go to Germany, and so just as with Hungarian I am very .. well not disappointed but just really sad. (Not the best performance here…..)

Italian:

Now I would like to speak a little bit in Italian – where and how I’ve learned this language. Basically I did Erasmus in Italy in 2005, I think, yes in 2005, at the University of Bologna, but the Faculty is located in Forli - The faculty of Roberto Ruffili – Scienze internazionali e politiche – if I remember correctly. I don’t know.

I left to Italy with a very basic knowledge of the language (Italian). I knew how to introduce myself, I knew how to say Hello, Goodbye and maybe how to use passato prossimo, when it comes to grammar, but nothing more. When I came to Italy, I made my best to study the language. I bought a book – The old man and the sea, which was my first book in Italian and read it with a dictionary and translated every word that I didn’t know, that I didn’t understand. This is a very long and difficult process and I remember that the first 3-4 pages took me about 6 hours to read and of course I didn't understand everything, because even if I had the dictionary, there is also the grammar that needs to be explained. Step by step I came to finish the book and bought another one and so my passive knowledge of the language became better. Then, because I was in Italy, living only with Italians, I slowly learned also how to speak the language.

The only thing that maybe I could have done and that I didn’t do… I didn’t listen to radio, in a sense that I did watch TV – the Simpsons, La Fazenda, Gli Amici di Maria Filippi, Uomini e donne – all these things on Mediaset, but I think that I could have listened to a little bit more of radio (avrei potuto ascoltare not ascoltato of course....), because the spoken language – pure spoken word is more important when it comes to learning a language and in TV there are also pictures and sometimes you don’t hear people speaking that much. So.. this was my Italian. Now I would like to speak a little bit in Czech.

Czech:

I would like to speak a little Czech now, even though I think, that because I am Slovak to speak Czech just simply cannot be a problem for me and the term “to study Czech” – this is something that I shouldn’t even say out loud, because Slovaks understand the Czech language very well and Czech people also understand Slovak very well. The only problem might occur in the case a Slovak should speak Czech or a Czech person speak Slovak and the problem could simply be the accent. You can tell by the accent that the person is not Czech even though maybe 3 times (having sudden problems with the ř there?? :) I’ve managed to .. when I was in the Czech republic at the Kajetanka dormitory and I was talking to Czechs that I had not met before and I was talking to them in Czech, when I told them after 20 minutes that I was Slovak, they were very surprised. Now that I’ve been living here on Taiwan for more than a year, and I haven’t been in the Czech republic for a long time, it’s natural I think that I make a lot of mistakes and it is definitely obvious that I am Slovak. Especially now that I have been speaking in 5 or 6 languages, I think that I have a small mix in my head and to concentrate on a good and correct accent is pretty difficult.

What I think might be the only problem for Slovaks, apart from the accent when they want to speak Czech (made a mistake here mluvit Česky, not mluvit po Česky) would be, at least for me in particular it was the fact, that I didn’t know the difference between the Proper Czech language and Prague Czech language, because in Slovakia we have a lot of Czech music and a lot of Czech television. I used to listen to a lot of Chaozz (name of a band). I think that people from my generation, probably all of them know this group and when I came to Prague, I didn’t know.. I simply used to hear a lot of expressions like “vokno” for instance or “nech to bejt” and I simply didn’t know how to differentiate what is Proper Czech and what is not and then there is one more problem, which is the instrumental case. The instrumental in the Czech language is quite different from the Slovak one, which I realized only when I had to do a translation from English into Czech and MS Word always kept telling me that the given word is incorrect – S městy, S městema, S městami – I just didn’t know what should be the correct from and only later I had to look it up so..

I think that however it may be, for a Slovak person to speak Czech or for a Czech person to speak Slovak – this cannot be a problem. I will try to continue, I will speak - well I will try to speak Spanish.

Spanish:

So Spanish..Spanish is a language that I have learned in New York during one summer, but I cannot say, that I speak Spanish well. How have I learned Spanish: I was listening to news in Spanish, every day, practically every day I was listening to the United nations radio and after that – because I was working in a clothing store which is called Quicksilver, which is at Times square in New York, I spoke every day with my colleagues, this way learning the language. Before studying Spanish I spoke already very well Italian and so because I think Italian and Spanish are basically “cousins” when it comes to languages, when one knows one and is learning the other it actually not that difficult.

But, I have to say again, that the way I speak Spanish is nothing special and I know very well that I make mistakes and that basically my Spanish is a mix of Italian and Spanish. But I also have to say, that I can listen to the news without any problems, news about politics, about many different things and practically without any problems and I also need to say that I have never been in a Spanish speaking country, except for New York, where Spanish practically became an official language. I will speak French now.

French:

So, French. I have learned the language when I was little with the sister of my grandmother. I forgot when I began the studies of this language. Maybe when I was 7-years old, I really do not remember any more. Just as with Spanish I know, that I don’t speak the language very well, but at the same time I can listen to news in French, what I think is..I think that the language of the news is very complicated and complex, so this for me is already pretty important to know – to be able to understand this language (the language of the news. I messed up.) So, I also have to say that exactly as with French I have never… I have been in France 3 times, but never for more than 3 weeks and this time is not enough to learn the language. It is enough to understand some of the grammar rules and maybe to start to speak a little, but is absolutely not enough to speak a language as I was speaking English in this recording (podcast), for instance. So.. there we go.. I will speak Slovak.

Slovak:

Finally I can use my native language. It is quite exhausting by the way to speak in this “official” manner and try to give the best possible performance in 10-11 languages, in such a short time, because it is quite stressful. If I would talk only to myself on my own (with no one listening), I would probably not make as many mistakes as I have done now. I did what I could. As my friend said: It doesn’t matter how well a person speaks a language, it will come out 60-70% worse when recorded.

I will try to speak Portuguese now, even though Portuguese is the language that I speak worst of all the languages I know, but I will try it nevertheless, because Portuguese – similarly to some of the other languages that I know – even though I cannot speak it very well, I can for instance understand the news and read books, what I personally think already is quite a big achievement for me.

Portuguese (almost):

I will speak in Portuguese, but I don’t speak Portuguese very well. I was never in Brazil, I was never in a place where Portuguese is spoken, but I am capable of understanding… I understand the news in Portuguese. Why do I always say that the news is so important? It is because the language of the news is very complicated. Very complicated. Words from Latin are used (this is probably the dumbest sentence in the entire recording…the majority of words in Portuguese are from Latin…) which …..

149 comments:

  1. Thank you:)I have seen your blog. Good luck!

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  2. I love this. Very inspiring. Thank you.

    I'm Thai. I know English. And I'm learning Mandarin Chinese as well. Absolute beginner though.

    /Cheers from Thailand

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  3. Hi,I loved this recording.Great inspiration!!!!I'm from Poland,can speak English and understand Russian,Czech and Slovakian a little bit-just because Slavic languages are so similar,especially when it comes to grammatical constructions-They are easier to comprehend.My next challenge is French.Hopefully I'll be speaking it fluently in a year's time:).All the best to you!

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  4. Kasia,

    thank you for the nice comment :) You know, there is this great Polish radio podcast called Salon polityczny Trojki which I have been listening to for maybe 2-3 years now and I think I should be able to understand formal Polish well, but I can't speak and I have trouble understanding informal Polish.

    I am not an expert, but I really think our languages are much closer than a lot of people usually might think. When I started listening to the show, I just tried to concentrate really hard to sort of guess the meaning of the sentences and only had to look up maybe 30 - 40 words that were impossible to understand contextually like niestety or natomiast. I think most of Slovaks and Czechs could understand the talkshow after a couple of weeks of listening. I'm sure there are Czech and Slovak podcasts like this as well so this could work both ways.

    I found the Slovak and Czech governmental radio podcasts if you'd like to give it a try:

    Czech:

    Website:

    http://hledani.rozhlas.cz/iradio/?defaultNavigation=+generic2:^%22%C4%8CRo+1+-+Radio%C5%BEurn%C3%A1l%22$

    Podcast link:

    http://www2.rozhlas.cz/podcast/cro1.rss

    Slovak:

    Website:

    http://www.rozhlas.sk/radio-slovensko/web-archiv?rel=379

    Podcast (unfortunately discontinued for the moment):

    http://www.rozhlas.sk/inetportal/web/podcast/index.php?id=425

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  5. Vladimir-Daniel here, wow you are so inspiring, I remember a couple of years back when we were tlaking in Kajetanka vratnice...wow, now I am in Bratislava learning your language slowly, but hopefully now it will speed up, because i am really inpsired by your work. GREAT JOB man. I will post here at the blog but if you have another email, please send it to me at dnljoel5@gmail.com
    awesome dude

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  6. Daniel,

    thank you very much for the nice comments. I really appreciate it.

    Keep me posted on your progress with Slovak. Do you get a lot of intereference from Czech?

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  7. Hey man, your recording was really good. Thank you for uploading that. I'm learning 8 languages as well. You're an inspiration. Hit me up if you ever want to learn Indonesian/Malay.

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  8. Jordan,

    thank you very much for the nice comment.

    What languages are you learning?

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  9. Très impressionnant Vladimir! Combien de temps consacres-tu chaque jour à l'étude des langues?

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  10. Bonjour Solal,

    Merci beaucoup pour le commentaire.

    Ca depend. Maintenant j'essaie d‘etudier le persan, mais j'ai beaucoup d'autres choses a faire, donc je suis heureux si je peux consacrer une heure par jour a cette langue. Je me souviens quand j'apprenais le russe, j'ecoutais les podcasts en russe pour un grand nombre d'heures chaque jour pendant 2-3 mois.

    Si je n'etudie pas une langue activement, je au moins essaie de maintenir les langauges quelles je deja connais. Je lis des livres ou ecoute les nouvelles en langauges differents. Il est difficile de dire pour combien de temps, mais je dirais 1-2 heures par jour.

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  11. Great podcast, Vladimir! Your Hungarian pronunciation is great, truly impressing. Keep up the good work!

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  12. Orsolya,

    thank you very much for the nice words.

    I am sad that I can't use Hungarian that often anymore and I feel like I forgot everything. I haven't been speaking Hungarian on a daily basis since I was maybe 6 or 7 years old so it's been more than 20 years now.

    I'm really happy that I still can remember what I remember though. I was thinking that my version of Hungarian could maybe serve as research material for historians of the language, since I rarely spoke Hungarian to anyone but myself after I was 7 and had almost no influence from other people or TV, so I should speak a language that was spoken 20 years ago (accent, grammar, vocabulary), or at least that's what I think might be the situation.

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  13. Great idea:) Though grammar and accent don't really change over 20 years, grammar is the least prone to change of all. You did hit home with vocabulary, a lot of words were borrowed mainly from English, others became obsolete. I think you should rather offer you brain for mapping, linguists can search for old words in newspapers and such :).

    Do you have any insight about learning Russian as a Hungarian native speaker? Started a few weeks ago, I'm determined, but it goes sloooowly, having had to learn a new alphabet and all. Még egyszer, le a kalappal, igazán inspiráló a történeted!

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  14. True, true, I take it back. Even old poems from the 19th century don't seem to change in grammar that much. When I watch some talkshows from the 80's, the accent does seem a little different though, or maybe that was only my impression:)

    As for Russian from a Hungarian speaker's point of view, I really haven't thought about this one. I was always looking at Russian from a Slovak speaker's point of view and of course for us it is very easy (compared to a German person for instance). Interesting question though. I did my Bachelor's thesis on the comparison of Slovak, Hungarian and Chinese nouns and even though you usually can express the same noun form in all three languages, you usually have to do it in a completely different way.

    If you like, I could try to help you with Russian (although most parts of the grammar that are difficult for you are easy for me and I can't explain them very well, because they are the same in Slovak) in exchange for Hungarian chats:)

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  15. Hi Vladimir!

    Great recording! I'm fascinated with your ability. I'm American but my parents immigrated from Slovakia. So I speak what we call "Slovish" A mixture of Slovak and English at home. I have lots of family in Slovakia and would like to speak proper Slovak. Any tips?

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  16. Thank you for the nice comment.

    Maybe you could develop Slovish into something like Slovak creole:)That would be interesting research material. It would be also interesting to hear what accent you have in Slovak, whether you have an American accent or the local accent of the dialect of your parents.

    You could try to listen to Slovak news online from the National Slovak radio or read novels in Slovak. Here are the links to the news broadcasts:

    Website:

    http://www.rozhlas.sk/radio-slovensko/web-archiv?rel=379

    Podcast (unfortunately discontinued for the moment):

    http://www.rozhlas.sk/inetportal/web/podcast/index.php?id=425

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    Replies
    1. Braavo Bro and I hope you to learn also , Somali language , the OLD Language of the Horn of Africa ,ancestral of all that languages that you learnt ! It is amazing I learnt Somali and it is like a dictionnary of all humanbeing's different languages ,make this experience with patience !

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  17. Dear Vladimir, your ability to speak languages is very impressive, pleasant and admirable! I am Bulgarian(-American), claiming to speak four, and read and undersand Polish, just begun French and love it! My serious learning of English started after 33, and in general, I strongly believe in the man's ability to learn foreign languages after 40s. I will definately use your reccomended sites. If Bulgarian language is one of your interest, let me know. What are your academic plans? Ph.D. in linguistics? Thank you very much! skype vera19603

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  18. Dear Vera,

    thank you very much for the nice comment.

    I wish more people would learn languages at higher ages. My grandmother's sister started to learn English when she was 80 so it's never late:)

    I have been in Bulgaria only once in 2001 in the summer on Slanchev Bryag and Burgas. It was very nice but unfortunately all I can remember from Bulgarian is 'vsuchko' and 'grad'.

    I would like to do a PhD in linguistics, thank you for asking. I don't know where would be best to do it and I'm also still looking for the right topic. I would like to use some of the articles I posted on this blog, but they would need much much more work.

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  19. Vladimir, I envy you_)
    You can read Evgenie Onegin Pushkin in the Original

    Milena

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  20. Vladimir,

    I am certain Harvard will be desperate to have you as a Ph.D. student. The benefit of applying to Harvard is this is one of the few colleges in the U.S, where international students could receive a full scholarship including, room and board. If I could be useful with information, and you would like, let we talk. Best!

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  21. Dear Milena,

    :)) Thank you.

    I think I should. But naybe I should download it as an audiobook. My reading in Russian is too slow:(

    Dear Vera,

    thank you for regarding my abilities so high, but I have never even thought about Harvard as it seemed out of my league and a little bit more complicated to organize than a PhD say in Prague or Taipei:)

    But if there's a chance, I would be very interested of course. I have added you on skype and if you'd like to contact me, please write to vladimir (at) foreverastudent.com

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  22. Vladimir,
    Very impressed with your talents, surprised you are not working for some government agency doing linguistics. When I read your blog about Hungarian, it may be think back to when I spoke Hungarian as a child to my grandma. As you might already know, us Americans are mono linguistic and as we grew older, we stop speaking Hungarian and it was shame because now at 30 years old, I'm trying to relearn the basics, it not as easy as I thought it would be. Keep up the good work and look forward to hear about your adventures. Besides the 11 languages you already spoken, are there any others that you plan on learning for the future?

    Regards
    Blake

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  23. Dear Blake,

    thank you for the nice comments.

    I think I can relate to what you're saying as well. I stopped speaking Hungarian at home when I was about 7 or 8 and only spoke it occasionally after that which is a shame. I would love to speak it daily now, but as you can imagine there are not a lot of Hungarian speakers here in Taiwan so all I do is I listen to some Hungarian podcasts or audiobooks. I don't know how well you still speak Hungarian, but there is a really nice site where you can download audiobooks in Hungarian for free legally. I have it in my links somewhere on my blog if you'd like to try.

    I am trying to learn Farsin now, thank you for asking. It's the first time I am learning a language only through a course book and with absolutely no native speakers around and it is really demotivating to do it this way and I am happy if I can manage one lesson per day.

    I'm learning a little bit of Taiwanese every now and then but not taking it very seriously. Just testing my sound-only approach to tonal languages and entertaining locals:)

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  24. Dear Vladmir,
    Well I am just now getting back into it and would appreciate the site where I could download some audiobooks. Well my knowledge of Hungarian is not as good as I want it. Well if you want someone to speak with I could most def use the practice and exposure. I was speaking with a friend of mine and he said it perfectly to me, "don't you think it will be demotivating learning Hungarian and not have anyone to speak it with". How are you dealing with the demotivation? Is there any site to where you can have conversations with native speakers?
    Well best of luck with Farsin, how long do you plan on staying in Taiwan and learning?

    Blake

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  25. Dear Blake,

    this summer me and a friend of mine who is in a similar situation tried talking to each other in Hungarian, but after a while we ended up speaking Slovak again as it was too tiring :)

    It's not even the loss of motivation that is the problem, it is just frustrating that I'm forgetting my native language and it is hard to find someone really native to talk to.

    I heard about http://www.sharedtalk.com/ being a good site to find language exchange partners, but I never tried it.

    all the best

    Vladimir

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  26. Vladimir,
    I just wanted to thank you for the link to the Hungarian audiobooks link and the sharedtalk.com site. Got some books online and met some interesting people on the website, you should def check it out.
    Köszönöm mindenkinek a segítséget. Tartsa a kapcsolatot. :D

    Regards,

    Blake

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  27. Blake,

    great to hear that!:) I've been listening to Robinson Crusoe over and over , I think I should download something new too.

    Ha lesz idod, beszelhetnenk szkypon ha akarsz. Aztan majd megmondod hogy talaltal e valakit aki velem is bezselhetne vagy nem:)

    udv

    Vladimir

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  28. Alors il faut que tu apprennes le lituanien maintenant!

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  29. Now that's impressive! I really like the Czech part here, ale slovenská časť je rozhodne príliš krátka!
    Všetko dobré,

    Tomasz

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  30. :)

    I will do a recording only in Slovak next time.

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  31. HI,Vladimir.My name is cindy.I live in Taiwan.My English is bad. I read your material in funday,Saw you have the tribe standard, you take down yourself to introduce with 8 languages!is very impressive!

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  32. Hello Vladimir :) it is pretty interesting that your language skills are appreciated by some people around the World who you do not even know. I just need to classify myself among them. But if I would like to be more precise I do recognize those who can speak more than one language. :)

    I am from Slovakia as you are and my native languages are also Hungarian and Slovak. Do I guess correctly that your mother tongue is Hungarian? I try to be able to speak English correctly and I also started recently with German language. I had learned Japanese at university but it was enough only to taste into the language and the hardest part is just ahead.

    And I wonder how did you get to Taiwan. Once I would like to visit some part of Asia.... And I hope you do understand my English :)

    Bye
    Sophia

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    Replies
    1. Hello Sophia,

      thank you very much for the nice comment.

      Your English is perfectly understandable don't worry:)

      I learned Hungarian in kindergarten and even though it doesn't look like it now, it is my native language. I feel sad that I am forgetting it more and more, but unfortunately I have very little chances to practice it, wherever I go.

      As for Taiwan, I was a student at the Chinese studies department in Prague and our faculty was cooperating with a university here in Taiwan. I was an exchange student first and now I work in a local company.

      Do you speak better Slovak or Hungarian?:) Did you study Japanese as a part of your major, or just out of interest?

      Vladimir

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    2. Hi Vladimir,

      I think that you can practice your Hungarian language knowledge by reading or listening, but I am sure that it is not a brand new for you.:) Of course I can admit that if a person is not in the language environment than reading and listening helps not that much. But it is better than nothing. :)

      I speak better Hungarian while it is my mother tongue. I attended school taught in hungarian until my high school studies. When I went to university I was more included in slovak language because I have attended university in Slovak language.

      I study finance but I recently realized that what makes me happy is when I learn languages. I was on student exchange program in Germany last semester and that just make me more realize how great is learning language and also others culture.

      In this way Japanese is just out of interes studiing. I have got some plan that includes also studiing or working and living in Japan.

      May I ask you how did you decided to learn at Chninese studies department? And than may I ask you what do you do for living in Taiwan? What can somebody do after finishing studies at Chinese studies department?
      And you have this recording above in 11 languages... Have you been in all of countries where these languages are spoken?

      Have a nice day :)
      Sophia

      Delete
    3. Dear Sophia,

      I try to listen to Hungarian radio talk shows every week, but as you said, it is not the same thing as talking to a person or being in a group of people. But still better than nothing. I can read in Hungarian, but only very very slowly:)

      As far as studying at the Chinese department goes, I wanted to learn to speak Chinese and a friend of mine suggested I should apply to the Chinese department in Prague. In Taiwan I work as a language consultant for a Taiwanese company.

      I think most people that graduate from the Chinese department work as translators, teachers or continue doing research. I think there are also a lot of graduates who translate Chinese literature into their native languages for instance.

      I haven't been to a Portuguese or a Spanish speaking country yet, but I would like to very much.

      Maybe you could try studying Japanese at the Japanese department in Prague. I hear the quality is very good. You could then go on an exchange study trip to Japan for instance.

      wishing you a nice day too:)

      Vladimir

      Delete
  33. Vladimir, complimenti davvero per il tuo italiano, per la proprietà di linguaggio e la ricchezza lessicale. E naturalmente un applauso al tuo grande talento poliglotta. Sei di grande ispirazione!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Grazie mille per i bei complimenti.

      con distinti saluti

      Vladimir

      Delete
  34. Parabéns! Sua fluência é impressionante em todas essas línguas! Continue assim! Quanto ao português, uma dica: em algum ponto durante o aprendizado você terá que decidir que variante irá aprender - o português do Brasil ou o de Portugal. Muitas diferenças, não só em termos de pronúncia, como também de gramática e pragmática. Aliás, você pode dizer, por esse texto, se o meu português é do Brasil ou de Portugal?
    Grande abraço,
    Rafael Lanzetti

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Rafael,

      Speaking Portuguese is difficult for me but writing in Portuguese is impossible:)Please let me reply in English this time.

      Thank you very much for the nice words.

      I would like to and always wanted to learn the Portuguese that is used in Brazil. I heard a song from Brazil when I was a child long before I knew what Portuguese was and since then I loved the sound of the it.

      My knowledge of Portuguese is really very basic, so it is difficult for me to say, based on your writing, whether you are using Portuguese from Brazil or Portugal. Your name suggests you might be Brazilian, but something tells me your writing is more similar to European Portuguese, but it is only a guess.

      On the other hand if you were using 'voce' in an informal way like they do in Brazil, you might be Brazilian. But you also used: Sua fluencia.. which is maybe used only if you are being formal. But these are all only guesses. I would say Brazilian:)

      Vladimir

      Delete
  35. Well done Vladimir!

    I can only dream to speak as many languages as you :) I have been in Germany for the last 5 months, learning German. Its my first language other than my native English. So keep up the good work, really find it motivating having people like you to look up to!

    Kent

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    Replies
    1. Dear Kent,

      thank you very much for the nice comment.

      Good luck with your German studies. I know a lot of native English speakers who managed to get absolutely fluent in German in a relatively short amount of time.

      wish you a swift progress:)

      Vladimir

      Delete
  36. At first I wanted to say something about ''google translate, translit and next time use a webcam'' so we can be sure you're not reading it off paper, but I must say after I've seen your humility and a real passion for mastering each one of your languages, instead of just going intermediate and brag about speaking 20 languages fluently, I must say I'm impressed and keep up the good work.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for the nice comment.

      You know, when I did the recording, apart from the fact that I was afraid that people would think that I was just a show off, I was a bit afraid that there would be too much non-constructive negative criticism (that's also one reason why I didn't do a youtube video) and that people might think that I was reading what I said off the screen or a piece of a paper. I really didn't want to come across like a show off or a 'hey everyone, look at me what I can do' type of a person and waited until there were a lot of similar recordings or videos out there, so that I would be just one of many. The only thing I had written down on paper was the topic for each language so that I would have something to talk about right away and would not waste time thinking about it. I did the recording in one go and it was the first and only recording, but it took me about 10 bad attempts to start it, because I was really quite nervous:)

      Delete
    2. OK the thing I'm curious about is how deep is your language knowledge? I've been studying English for over 6 or 7 years ( by studying I mean I didn't really mean to learn it, but I liked some music genres and I wanted to learn what they were singing/rapping about, so I learned a lot of slang and vernacular English before I learned there is this verb form for 3rd person singular) I tested my vocab and got 15200 words which is kinda nice, but I'm not really satisfied with it. It's more than what an average high school teacher know here in my country, but still only 75% of what I would know if I were a native speaker of the same age with no special skills. I'm 21 btw. I comprehend a lot and may struggle with only Scouser or Cockney speakers and my pronunciation is great, but I still make mistakes ( like pronouncing booklet with the e pr. as in let instead of e in she without the : in IPA. Maybe it's the i in hit, but I'm not sure now) Or if you encounter word like miscellaneous, you can't be sure how to pronounce it even if you've studied it for years and have to look it up. And this took me 7 years to become something between C1/C2 level. I'd prolly pass CPE with preparations. My German is intermediate at most and I want to learn several languages and so the capital question is: Are you really so competent in all of these. Learning Czech sounds like Bosnian pentaglot who speaks Bosnian, Croatian,Serbian, Montenegrin and Serbo-croatian and going from Italian to Spanish might not be such a problem (even though you have this Italian accent in it), but Hungarian or Chinese for instance takes a lot of time, doesn't it?

      My sub-question: Is Classical Chinese difficult if you already know Mandarin. I know that we can use any dialect to read it, because nobody speaks it, but is it really different, like for example Italian guy learning Latin?

      P.S. What on earth are you doing in Taiwan? Are you meeting Mike Campbell or learning the dialect from Minnan group?

      Delete
    3. Hello again,

      You are right, learning how to speak Czech for Slovak speakers who grew up listening to Czech (like me) requires marginal effort and very little actual learning. I would say it only takes practice and is still not even necessary as most Slovaks understand Czech and vice-versa. Younger generations and people who grew up with Slovak/Czech as their native language and no exposure to the other might have problems communicating though.

      It is also true that as you say learning how to speak Spanish or Portuguese after you already speak Italian well is much easier than learning these languages without the knowledge of Italian.

      I went to a Hungarian kindergarten and I learned Hungarian there. Chinese was the hardest thing I've ever tried to learn in my entire life:) Learning to walk must've been easier.

      In the languages that I've studied I tried to go deep enough so that I would not be restricted by the languages in my daily functioning in a native environment, but my knowledge varies from language to language. I read for instance about 5000-6000 pages in Italian and try to listen to daily financial news talk shows, same thing in Russian and German. I'm slowly slowly getting there in Chinese. As far as French, Spanish and Portuguese, I don't speak these language that well, but I try to listen to financial and political news in these languages every day and I understand 95-100% most of the time. I used to work as a freelance translator/interpreter from English to Slovak and vice-versa for about 7 years and spent a lot of time in the USA as a child so I think and hope that I speak English well.

      I think the biggest problem is to stay in touch with these languages, especially here in Taiwan, where native speakers of the languages I speak are hard to find and because of the time difference it is difficult to find time to talk to someone over skype too.

      As far as Classical Chinese goes, this is maybe a question for native speakers of Mandarin. For me, it is endlessly difficult, even though I speak Mandarin and for me personally learning Latin would be much easier, but this is only my relative point of view.

      There are also various versions of Classical Chinese, depending on which period the text was written in. From an absolute point of view, I think Latin would be easier for an Italian person to learn simply because of the fact that Latin grammar has been documented perfectly and can be learned, whereas the grammar of Classical Chinese remains still too complicated, complex and unclear and translators mostly - at least in my opinion rely on feel rather than actual documented grammar rules.

      I came to Taiwan as an exchange student to learn Chinese and now I work here. I met with Mike Campbell 4 or 5 times already too. As far as Southern min goes, I am learning a sentence here and there, but I don't think I'll ever come even close to being fluent in this language. I just occasionally entertain my colleagues at work with it:)

      Delete
    4. OK and thanks for your reply. I wish you good luck with your upcoming studies and to maintain as much as you can in the languages you already know. Good job

      I tried to learn Vietnamese at some point of my life and it's a tough one. Everybody says stuff like: "Tones are crazy, but no grammar." But it really doesn't end with tones. Especially some vowels are difficult to produce (not to mention with the right tone). But even though the grammar might seem easy. You just say stuff like: Today cold. You feel good not? But there are hundreds of classifiers and it's not really that easy.

      Anyway, take care.

      Delete
    5. Wish you good luck with your studies as well.

      A lot of people say that grammar in languages like Chinese or Vietnamese is easy but after almost loosing my mind a couple of times with Mandarin I really can say that Mandarin grammar is anything but easy. Of course it will look easy for someone who would be looking for complicated past tense structures and would find none, but grammar doesn't end with past tenses either.

      Wish you all the best again.

      Vladimir

      Delete
  37. Ahoj mám dotaz. Naučil ses zjednodušené nebo tradiční znaky. Řekl bych, že tradiční, když žiješ na Tchajwanu, ale většina lidí se učí jiantizi.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ahoj,

      dva roky som sa učil zjednodušené znaky a dva a pol roka odkedy som na Taiwane tradičné.

      Najprv som na tradičné znaky nadával ale pravda je,že sa oveľa ľahšie pamätajú, lebo sa od seba odlišujú oveľa viac ako zjednodušené znaky, takže pokiaľ sa nemusíš učiť písať rukou sú podľa mňa tradičné znaky lepšie. Písať rukou neviem dobre ani jedny ani druhé.

      Vlado

      Delete
    2. Paráda. No ono v době počítačů a psaní znaků pchinjinem nebo pomocí radikálů je kaligrafie tak trochu anachronismus.
      Díky

      Šimon

      Delete
    3. Presne tak. Možno ani nie anachronizmus, lebo vedieť písať znaky rukou na Taiwane a v Číne stále sem tam treba (banka, úrady atď.), ale nie je to úplne nevyhnutné.

      Na začiatku je podľa mňa zbytočné učiť sa písať znaky naspamäť, ale to je len môj osobný názor. Na začiatku podľa mňa stačí vedieť 50-100 najbežnejších znakov, aby sa človek naučil systém, vedieť sa podpísať a to je všetko.

      všetko dobré

      Vlado

      Delete
  38. Rewelacyjny akcent, pozdrawiam! Jak się go nauczyłeś?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dzienkuje bardzo. Zalezy od jezyku. Niektóre jezyki wyuczylem, kiedy bylem jeszcze malym i niepaietam jak tego zrobilem.

      Co dotyczy na przyklad wloskiego, to staralemsie coździennie jak najwiecej sluchać wiadomości po wlosku, mówić s jak najwiencej ludźmi i podczas rozmow sluchać sam sobie.


      S innymi jezykami staralemsie zrobić to samo, ale myszle, ze nie zawsze sie mi to udalo. Co na przyklad rosyjskiego dotyczy, wielu Rosyjan mówi, ze mam silny slowacki akcent, kiedy mówie po rosyjsku.


      (prozse przebaczenia za blendy:)

      Delete
  39. Čau Vlado. Tak jsem se rozhodl, že se začnu učit čínsky a chtěl bych poradit z pár věcmi. Chtěl bych se naučit více jazyků, ale je mi 21 a chci začít s čínštinou, dokud mám dobrou paměť, protože si nedokážu představit, že bych se učil znaky někdy v 50 letech. Chci se zeptat, jestli není nějaký trik jak se učit znaky, třeba podle radikálů a jestli bys mi nedoporučil nějakou skvělou učebnici. V Česku jich pár vyšlo, ale třeba Čínština pro samouky je sepsaná nějakou blbkou po 4 letech studia, naprosto neprofesionálně a dokonce tam míchá i tradiční znaky a tak spíš uvažuji o TY Mandarin. Také si myslím, že je výhodnějhší učit se znaky "při cestě" a jen ty co potřebuji a né nějaké drilly, kde se budu učit 50 znaků děnně pro slova, která skoro nepoužiji. Myslíš, že si znak lépe zapamatuji,když budu je budu zapisovat i ve správném pořadí tahů, protože já nejsem ten případ s fotografickou pamětí. Co se týče tónů, tak to se nebojím, protože jsem se chvíli učil vietnamsky a tam mají dokonce o dva více a navíc jsou si některé daleko podobnější, Z hlásek se bojím jenom j a r (pinyin). R se totiž vyslovuje jako polské rz nebo ż a to je trochu jiná hláska než naše "československé" ž. A poslední otázka: Jak dlouho si myslíš je dostatečná doba, abych komunikoval, alespoň na základní úrovni? Jinak sice Rosetta Stone nemusím, ale ještě teď si pamatuji jednu větu: "Zhi ge nühaizi zai he shui." a když jsem jí jednou přednesl, přes internet, tak mi jí jeden Číňan pochválil. :)

    P.S. Nejsem z těch, co hned něco vzdají, jakmile se dostanou k 7. lekci a nepochopí, že in se s členem může spojit na nell' atd. a budu to studium brát vážně, jen bych chtěl vykročit správnou nohou. Díky moc. Jinak mluvím plynně anglicky a domluvím se i německy a do menší míry i rusky, ale ty si vážně frajer. Když jsem slyšel tvojí italštinu, tak jsem si vzpomněl na jednoho známého http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KAfymsd93U0 . Mluví česky, italsky a německy, francouzsky, španělsky a cestuje po celém světě. Jednou jsme měli na návštěvě Itala a ten o něm řekl, že mluví líp jak on. Simultánně nám překládal a byla to bomba, tvoje italština mi ho úplně připomněla, je skvělá. A ještě pochválím ruštinu. Někdo může říct, že je to jednoduché pro slovana, ale sám mívám problémy třeba s měkkým š atd. Zníš skoro jak můj kámoš z Ukrajiny.

    Take care

    ReplyDelete
  40. Čau Vlado. Tak jsem si přečetl ty tvé typy a docvaklo mi to. Myslím, že máš 100%ní pravdu s tím, že snažit se u každé slabiky vyslovit co nejsprávněji ten tón celý ten proces učení akorát zpomaluje. Například ve vietnamštině může mít slovo ma až 6 významů (mà, mã, mả, má ,mạ, ma),ale to neznamená, že každá slabika má přesně 6 ekvivalentů. Třeba slovo đá má jak význam kopat, tak kámen a ještě si to násobit 6 by byl horor. Navíc nás také nikdo neučil, že máme nějaké souhlásky vyslovovat dlouze, krátce, nebo zvedat intonaci při otázce. Naučili jsme se to sami a navíc rodilí mluvčí thajštiny, vietnamštiny, kantonštiny, kolikrát ani netuší, že mluví tónovými jazyky. Narozdíl od čínštiny je, ale zápis tónů ve vietnamštině součást pravopisu, takže je to možná i nevýhoda (před sto, dvě stě lety psali taky pomocí znaků). Myslím, že pro studenta je, ale bázlivost zapříčiněná především různými významy. Například se naučí slovíčko phố (ulice) a pokud ho vysloví jako phồ (šlapka) tak si mohou vykoledovat i p̀̀řes hubu. :) Tvé tipy mi opravdu pomohli se na mé budoucí studium dívat z jiné perspektivy.

    P.S. Máš Skype?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dakujem velmi pekne za povzbudive slova:)

      Skusim najprv odpovedat na tvoje otazky:

      1)
      Chci se zeptat, jestli není nějaký trik jak se učit znaky, třeba podle radikálů a jestli bys mi nedoporučil nějakou skvělou učebnici.

      Ja myslim - ale toto je naozaj len moj skromny osobny nazor, ze sa s ucenim znakov vobec netreba ponahlat a je lepsie sa ich ucit pozvolna priebezne a bez akehokolvek stresu. Jednoducho neuc sa nic co ti absolutne netreba a ak nieco zabudnes, tak zabudnes. Najdolezitejsie je vediet rozumiet a rozpravat a znaky ta len zbytocne zbrzdia na zaciatku. Ja viem ze vela ludi taha cinstina hlavne kvoli znakom a ucit sa ich vobec nie je zly napad, ale ja by som to robil len velmi volne. Navyse ak uz budes vediet rozpravat, ucit sa znaky bude ovela lahsie. Je neporovnatelne jednoduchsie a praktickejsie ucit sa znak niecoho co si pred tym bud vyslovil alebo pocul 20-30 krat. Aspon z mojho pohladu.

      Triky nepoznam ziadne a jedinu knihu ktoru som si kupil bola od Williama McNaughtona - Reading and writing Chinese, ale velmi som sa z nej neucil. To skor kvoli konzultaciam. Potom existuje program ktory sa vola Anki. Mozno ho poznas ak nie, skus vygooglovat, mozno sa ti zide.

      Dolezitejsie ako radikaly su podla mna foneticke jednotky v znakoch, ktore casto presahuju radikaly. Ak chces, skus si nieco najst o nich na internete. Vela som o nich necital ale viem co to je z praxe a je to ovela uzitocnejsie ako radikaly, hoci tie treba vediet tiez.


      2)
      Myslíš, že si znak lépe zapamatuji,když budu je budu zapisovat i ve správném pořadí tahů, protože já nejsem ten případ s fotografickou pamětí.

      Neviem na toto celkom odpovedat, ale asi si znaky lepsie zapamatas ak ich budes aj zapisovat. Problem je len v tom, ze to ta bude stat este viac casu a to podla mna nie je dobre. Proste cinstina je velmi tazka a stratou casu pri uceni sa znakov sa este komplikuje. Ak by som sa ja mohol este raz zacat ucit cinstinu, znaky by som sa ucil priebezne a velmi volne, bez rukopisu - okrem zakladov pisma a 50 najbeznejsich znakov.

      3)
      Jak dlouho si myslíš je dostatečná doba, abych komunikoval, alespoň na základní úrovni?

      To je pomerne tazka otazka. Zavisi co pre teba znamena zakladna uroven. Ja myslim, ze keby som sa ucil cinsky uplne inac ako som sa na zaciatku ucil tak par mesiacov by stacilo. Ale naozaj zavisi, co je ta zakladna uroven. Tak ako je ucebny system nastaveny teraz tak zial minimalne pol roka. Ak by si bol v 100%tne cinskom prostredi cely den a kazdy den a ucil by si sa len rozpravanim tak mozno tri-styri mesiace.


      V Europe je tazko si take prostredie vytvorit. Mne velmi pomohlo, ze som pocuval lekcie od chinese-pod.com. Ak ich nepoznas, skus sa pozriet. Mam ale pocit, ze uz neponukaju lekcie zadarmo. Pocuval som dookola ich dialogy a snazil som sa so slovnikom odchytit vsetky slova, ktorym som nerozumel.

      V CR je plno cinskych restauracii, ja som si tam nasiel kamaratov a ucil ich cesky vymenou za cinstinu. Stale to bolo sice malo, ale pomohlo to.

      Dufam, ze som ti aspon ako-tak pomohol:) Mam skype. Ak chces, posli mi mail na vladimir(at)foreverastudent.com. Ak by som ti neodpisoval, tak mi o tom napis sem, lebo sa stava, ze mi na tu adresu maily z nejakeho zvlastneho dovodu nedochadzaju.

      Vsetko dobre

      Vlado

      Delete
  41. hi. im Safreen, from Malaysia. I like what u're doin right now. besides, u kindda aspiring me to learn more languages. i realy admire u. besides I set up this blog to pop out everytime i open my internet. now, i can say that i know only 4 languages (Malay, English, Arabic and Mandarin) and in next month i will start my Korean class. and u know what after I read your blog, somehow it gave me a spirit to learn the russian's language family (if I can call that hihi...)- russian, czech and bosnian, and i already buy the books, the CD's and i've learn a lot from youtube. I just want to ask you, is that a good idea if I learn this 3 languages all the same time? for example the word 'good morning', I learn the russian, czech, bosnian all at the same time, and then move to the other words. I thought that this 3 languages looks the same, so maybe I can go through this together.. is that acceptable in learning a languages? can I do that?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello Safreen,

      thank you very much for the nice words.

      There are people who tried learning multiple languages from the same language family at the same time, but I personally didn't and probably would not recommend it that much, especially if you will be learning languages as hard as Russian, Czech and Bosnian. Many people will probably tell you that it's not a good idea exactly because they are too difficult and too similar and that you will eventually start confusing them.

      Besides, these three languages are so distant from the languages that you speak right now that it will be a big challenge just to learn one of them. I trust you are a talented learner but even the most talented people like Richard Simcott need a very long time to learn a language that is distant from the languages they already speak - if they are not in the country where the language they want to learn is spoken - what I assume is your case.

      I would concentrate on Russian completely if I were you. Once you get fluent in Russian, learning Czech and Bosnian will be easier. Learning all three languages at the same time will slow you down and you might end up learning a bit of each language and none perfectly.

      You also mentioned that you will start learning Korean and speak 4 languages already. I think soon you will have to do something to start maintaining your language skills so that you don't forget them and this is also going to take up a lot of your time so learning only Russian - if you want to learn it well - is probably what I would recommend.

      Vladimir

      Delete
    2. dear vladimir,
      Thank you for this good advise. at least now I know what is the best way. well.., you're right, u know, this morning after I woke up, i just grab the russian's book, and watch it on youtube and listened to the cd's, and I already started to slow down a bit, haha.. just to understand how to use the letter 'ь'and 'ы'..

      i will try my best to not forget all languages that i've learn bfore. Malay with my family, Arab- with some of my frends, english n Chinese- with my colleagues and for russian, i think im gonna talk to myself in front of mirror! haha..

      well, my goal is to become like u brother, a polyglot with 11 languages. hopefully I will someday. so, thank u again.

      Delete
    3. :)

      If you're looking for Russian speakers that you can talk to, maybe you could try this website - if you haven't seen it already: http://sharedtalk.com/

      It's a good place to find language exchange partners.

      Wish you good luck with your studies

      Vladimir

      Delete
  42. Buen trabajo, amigo Vladimir. Tu trabajo, tu aprendizaje nos motiva a todos. Te felicito. Yo aprendí el Inglés, Francés, Esperanto y un poquito de Alemán. Después de haberte encontrado en Youtube y haber visto tu Blog me siento más motivado para continuar estudiando. ¡Saludos desde Honduras!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Estimado Elmer,

      muchas gracias por el comentario. Le deseo mucha suerte con sus estudios. Saludos desde Taiwan :)

      Vladimir

      Delete
  43. This is the very first Slovak polyglot I had the chance to discover. I am very impressed. I have never expected that there could be someone who is able to speak in so many languages and with also very good porosity and finally the fact that there could be such a great polyglot from a such small country:). Keep doing what you are doing!
    Prajem ti veľa úspechov v učení sa nových jazykov. Ako som už napísal nikdy som neveril, že máme na Slovensku polyglota :). Všetko dobré s pozdravom Martin zo SK.

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    Replies
    1. Ahoj Martin,

      dakujem pekne za komentar. Myslim, ze na Slovensku je velmi vela velkych profesionalov, ktori sa mozno nesnazia ucit vela jazykov, ale ovladaju 2-3 na velmi vysokej urovni, myslim,ze na ovela vyssej ako ja. Akurat nemaju cas alebo potrebu robit webove stranky :)

      Posielam pozdrav domov

      Vlado

      Delete
  44. Zdravím Vlado

    No tak to je isto pozdrav domov z tej vzdialenosti:). A na Slovensko sa vrátiť ani moc asi už neplánuješ - tam nás predsa veľa toho nečaká:(.
    Máš pravdu, ale len 2-3 na možno vyššej, ale nie zas 10 ako ty :D.

    Inak aj tak musíš byť super inteligentný na jazyky. Pretože ja som momentálne na Erasmuse v nemecku. Učil som sa nemčinu tak zhruba rok predtým hodinku denne a teraz po troch mesiacoch ako tak dokazem komunikovať na všetky témy, ale s chybami, neplynulo a bez prízvuku. A to nehovorím o tom, že koľko som sa učil ešte tu v nemecku počúvanie/čítanie. A až teraz sa dostávam na tú úroven ze už nemusím tak veľa dookola počúvať rovnaké rádio podcasty, že jednoducho aj moja neznáma slovná zásoba sa rapídne zmenšuje.
    A ty po dvoch mesiacoch v lete si bol super plynulý + prízvuk:)! Mohol by si mi prosím napísať nejaký typ na výslovnosť a všeobecne na nemčinu čo doporučuješ? - vopred vďaka.

    Pozdravujem z Darmstadtu
    Martin

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Ahoj Martin,

      dakujem pekne za komentar.

      Ja som sa zacal nemecky ucit ked som mal 12 rokov a v takom veku by sa podla mna hocikto naucil cudzi jazyk velmi dobre a rychlo. Bol som v rakuskej rodine, ktora mala dvoch synov presne v mojom veku tak to islo hrozne rychlo. Pred tym som este cely skolsky rok doma na Slovensku chodil na doucovanie, takze to nebolo tak, ze som za par tyzdnov vedel super plynule po Nemecky. To nedokaze nikto na svete:)

      Nejake tipy na vyslovnost. Mne co dost pomohlo bolo, ze som nahlas cital nejaku nemecku knihu a Rakusan kamarat ma opravoval. Citat knihy vo vseobecnosti je podla mna najlepsi sposob, ako sa zlepsovat v cudzich jazykoch, ale trosku to kazi vyslovnost. Ja som si zvykol rovno do knih robit poznamky a preklady slov som si pisal na okraje stran. Po kazdych 10 stranach som potom opakoval. Cital som detektivky, lebo by som sa unudil k smrti keby to bolo daco ine.

      Dalsia vec, ktoru mozes robit je simultanne tlmocit v hlave podcasty alebo prednasky co pocuvas v skole do slovenciny. Dalsi level je potom pustit si TA3 a tlmocit slovenske spravy do nemciny:)

      Vlado

      Delete
    2. Zdravím Vlado

      Veľa vďák za tvoje typy. Ale aj tak super úspech, kedže si bol na konci na nerozoznanie so svojou plynulosťou v nemčine. A podľa mňa musíš byť talentovaný aj na prízvuk, predsa s tou nemčinou čo si hovoril v podcaste a vravíš, že už to už nieje taká kvalitná výslovnosť tak potom podľa týchto merítok som ja v tom ako hovorím po nemecky čístý niemand:).
      Lebo keď vidím napríklad ten analytický a usilovný prístup(napr. Luca) a aj tak nieje vo výslovnosti na tej úrovni ako ty tak formovanie accentu asi má aj niečo s talentom - alebo s nekonečnou drinou o ktorej nemám ani páru.
      To som si všimol, že iba detektívkam sa nevyhýbaš:). A s tým opakovaním som to ja robil tak, že som opakoval celú kapatilu, ale asi by stačilo len tie vety kde sa nachádzajú neznáme slová?
      S tým TA3 tak to je super typ, lenže moja nemčina sa ešte na to nechytá a je to podla mňa ešte vyšší level ako len myslieť v cieľenom jazyku. Lebo prekladať do nemčiny zložitý jazyk správ nebude pre mna ešte dlho nemožné.
      A s tým, že to čo počúvam a prekladať to naspäť do slovenčiny - trocha tomu nechápem. Nebolo by produktívnejšie radšej simulatívne opakovať to čo je hovorené v nemčine. Alebo to prekladanie späťmá aj nejaký linguistický dôvod - nejaké upevnovanie neuronovych spojení v mozgu:).
      Inak som dnes počúval tvoje podcasty a sú naozaj vo veľa aspektoch nápomocné. A aj to čo som sa dozvedel, že si v Ruštine bol za 5 týždnov schopný rozumieť bez slovníka tak to je super úspech to mne by možno trvalo tak 12 týždnov + celý den robit by som musel robiť len počúvať:).
      Inak Ti prajem veľa úspechov tam kde si a aj v tej linquistickej oblasti čo zamýšlaš(veľmi zaujímavé..) a s tou mandarinštinou ti už nemusím priať veľa pokrokov, pretože tú si už do značnej miery pokoril:)

      Zatiaľ s Pozdravom
      Martin

      Delete
    3. Ahoj Martin,

      som rad, ze sa ti pacili moje podcasty.

      Simultanne tlmocenie ako sposob upevnovania znalosti v cudzich jazykoch je podla mna velmi dobra vec a oboma smermi to ma zmysel - do cudzieho aj z cudzieho jazyka. Do cudzieho jazyka je to samozrejme ovela tazsie a ma to vacsi efekt, ale do rodneho jazyka je to velmi dobre cvicenie tiez.

      Hlavne je to samotne pocuvanie. Ide o to, ze pocuvanim cudzieho jazyka len tak, kvoli informaciam a nie kvoli tomu aby si sa nieco vedome ucil sa podla mna naucis o jazyku ovela viac ako vedomym studiom, takze hlavne je samotne pocuvanie. Ked sa nesustredis na to, aby si sa vedome ucil gramatiku a ucil sa len z kontextu, budes rozpravat podla mna ovela prirodzenejsie (I ked gramatika je samozrejme velmi dolezita, len podla mna by mala sluzit skor ako doplnkove vysvetlovanie detailov toho ktoreho jazyka, nie ako hlavny sposob ucenia). Problem je v tom, ze ja sa napr. casto po case prestanem sustredit na to co pocuvam a ked simultanne prekladam, tak sa to nestane. Dalej ako si vravel pri tlmoceni (jedno ktorym smerom) sa upevnuju asociacie medzi oboma jazykmi, vsimnes si hrozne vela detailov, ktore by si si inac nevsimol, hlavne, co sa tyka vetnych konstrukcii v cuzdom jazyku a podobne.

      Zaklad je vela pocuvat spravy a rozpravat sa s ludmi a pojde to samo:)

      WDR ma vyborny podcast o vede, ktory sa vola Leonardo. Mozno ho poznas. Rozpravaju v nom dost dost pomaly. Mozes skusit ten, ak chces.

      dakujem este raz za komentar a drzim palce

      Vlado

      Delete
    4. Zdravím Vlado,

      Dakujem za odpoved. Všetky tie typu sú mi veľmi nápomocné. Všetko čo si napísal dá sa povedať aj praktizujem okrem preklad zo SK-DE - na to ešte nemám. Navyše ja osobne musím nejaký podcast počúvať aspon tri razy a to v priebehu troch dní - idealne 5 dni.. aby som si zapamatal tému a zhruba aj slovnú zásobu. A potom mám pocit, že jazyk hovorený v tom danom podcaste je bližší mojej aktívnej slovnej zásobe v porovnaní s tým keby som to počúval zakaždým iba raz.
      Inak ked som čítal, že za 3 a pol mesiaca boli v talianštine plynulý od nuly. Tak to je fakt neuveriteľný progres. Mne by to trvalo celý rok a to nehovorím o tom že by som musel denne niekoľko hodín nad učením stráviť.
      Ale aj v tvojom prípade to bol asi veľmi intenzívny proces prekladania, čítania, opakovania. Koľko hodín ste sa vtedy s chalanmi učili ak si ešte spomínaš - len tak pre zaujímavosť?

      Drž sa aj ty na tom dalekom východe:)!
      Martin

      Delete
    5. Ahoj Martin,

      Nepamatam si uz velmi kolko casu sme travili ucenim sa talianciny. Myslim, ze sme mali 2 hodiny denne v skole po dobu asi 10 tyzdnov. Zda sa to mozno ako malo, ale tie ucitelky mali hrozne vela skusenosti s erazmus studentami a vedeli presne co a ako rychlo nas ucit, takze ten kurz bol uplne fantasticky.

      Mimo skoly som sa snazil citat knihy so slovnikom asi tak jednu-dve hod denne a potom sa cely den rozpraval s kamaratmi talianmi. Myslim, ze Slovak sa taliancinu moze naucit rychlejsie ako nemcinu, pretoze ak mas dobru slovnu zasobu v slovencine a vies anglicky tak taliancine pasivne rozumies ovela viac ako nemcine a to je na zaciatku velky rozdiel, takze si z toho nic nerob ak sa ti zda, ze ti ide nemcina pomalsie:)

      drzim palce

      Vlado

      Delete
    6. Zdravim Vlado,

      Tak to mi teda ide nemcina pomalsie to mas pravdu:).
      A to je tiez polovica uspechu docielit level kde pasivne rozumies vsetko pisane/hovorene. Inak ja musim simulativne citat a pocuvat a shadowat aby som docielil ako tak vyslovnost v nemcine. A vedel si pouzivat ten R zvuk co maju nemci. Lebo ja to viem vyslovit pomocou zadnej casti jazyka ale ked to chcem uplatnit v slovach tak to znie skor ako to franzuzske R. A podla mna toto je hlavny zvuk co nas prezradza ked pouzivame to tocene R, ze sme s vychodnych krajin:D.

      Inak som sa Ti zabudol podakovat za ten podcast od WDR. Maju tam zaujimave diskusie cize sa to oplati pocuvat. A ak este prilezitostne pocuvas nemcinu tak tiez nieco na vymenu Hr radio 1 talk - tiez doporucujem
      http://www.hr-online.de/website/radio/hr1/index.jsp?rubrik=23810

      Drz sa a este raz vdaka za podporu.
      Martin

      Delete
    7. Martin ahoj,

      Zaujimave, ze spominas to nemecke r. Ja som sa ucil nemecky ked som nad vyslovnostou velmi neuvazoval a pozeral som cely cas nemecky televizor ked som bol maly tak som sa ho naucil celkom dobre, ale musim povedat, ze teraz ked nemecky nerozpravam poriadne uz asi 12 rokov, mam s nim problem aj ja.

      Pokial viem, ty 'r' je v nemcine niekolko typov a ja mam problem len s jednym, presne tym, ktore si spominal.

      Vyslovuje sa koncom jazyka (je na to na 100% technickejsi termin, ale nemam predstavu aky:), ale ten priestor medzi jazykom a zadnymi dasnami musi byt mensi ako pri francuzskom 'r' a musis do toho dat viac zvuku, tak ako pri znelom francuzskom 'r'. Problem je v tom, ze ked zatlacis jazyk viac na dasna, z toho 'r' sa lahko stane nase slovenske 'ch'.

      Dakujem pekne za link na podcast. Az budem mat cas, urcite si vypocujem.

      drzim palce este raz

      Vlado

      Delete
    8. Zdravím Vlado,

      Hej to bola výhoda ked sa človek mladší učí ide to asi všetko rýchlejšie.
      Presne ako píšeš je to problematické vysloviť. Ja som sa ho naučil vdaka tomuto návodu na všetky nemecké zvuky:
      http://www.uiowa.edu/~acadtech/phonetics/german/frameset.html

      Ale ako som písal vyžaduje to u mna veľa tréningu toto R presadiť do plynulých viet. Inak v tomto si ma vlastne aj ty motival, že existuje reálna šanca aby človek znel tak že to nemci nerozoznajú alebo aspon nevedia určit odkial hovoriaca osoba pochádza :) - presne ako to bolo v tvojom prípade.
      Vela vdak, ze si vzdy nájdeš čas mi odpísať, ale už nemusíš, lebo si ani neviem predstaviť ako si zaneprázdnený so všetkými rôznymi záležitostiami na ktoré denne natriafaš.

      Prajem veľa úspechov a ešte raz vdaka.
      Martin

      Delete
    9. Martin ahoj,

      to je v poriadku. Rad odpisem. Tak vela zase toho nemam:)

      Kludne sa pytaj. Ak chces, mozes mi napisat aj na:

      vladimir(at)foreverastudent.com

      len musis zmenit (at) na zavinac.

      vsetko dobre

      Vlado

      Delete
  45. Hey, great job! I am toying with the idea of learning a set of languages also. I am Czech and already have English, Italian, French and a bit Serbian. Wanna add Russian, Spanish, Portuguese and Gaelic. How is the learning curve (when have you started just filling in the boxes)? What level do you want to get (is realistic to maintain) in each language? Have you ever thought about learning some Celtic languages? I am very much intrigued by those! Again great job and thanks for sharing some tips.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Ondrej,

      thank you for the comment and nice words.

      I am not sure I understood what you meant when you mentioned the learning curve. Did you mean the speed at which one picks up languages depending on the time one has spent learning them? If so, I think it it very individual and depends on the language. For you and me Russian is a relatively easy language to pick up, and the learning curve for us would be very steep (if this is what you're asking), whereas for a German or a Chinese person, it would be much more difficult and the learning curve would be ascend much slower.

      As far as setting goals, I try to get to a level in a language, where I could easily blend into the society where the language is spoken and not be limited by that language in any way. Just live an ordinary life of a local person where the language is no longer an issue. Of course I have a very long way to go, but this is my goal.

      Maintaining language knowledge or even proficiency is about as hard as learning the language itself. At least for me it is. It takes lots and lots of time and is very tiring.

      I have never thought about learning Celtic languages :) Thank you for asking. On the other hand I never thought I'd be learning Romanian and it happened, so I really don't know.

      Are there any Celtic words in Czech?

      Vladimir

      Delete
  46. Thanks for the reply Vlado,
    I was more thinking if it is getting easier with the number of languages that you already speak. After you learn 5 from different language groups it has to get a little faster with the 6th one, no?
    I understand about the blending. Its not necessary to speak 100% correctly but its about the ability to use the language. The problem with maintaining is serious. That's why I want to only learn languages that I am interested in, that come from a country and culture that I like. I think that will give me more opportunity to practice and to actually connect the language to experiences and interests. Struggling a bit with French in this sense.. gotta find more things about France that I like :)
    There is very little connection between Czech and Gaelic. Mainly place names like Ohre or Jizera. And of course the English name Bohemia comes from Gaelic. But in English there is much more. "lake" for example I think... coming from "loch".
    Languages are fascinating!! :)
    Cheers,
    Ondrej

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Ondrej,

      I can't really tell whether learning languages gets easier with the growing number of languages that you speak. I'm sure you know, that if you learn how to speak Spanish very well and then later start learning Italian, your progress will be very fast, but if in the same situation you start learning Chinese as was my case, you will have only some marginal advantage over your fellow learners.

      Me for instance, when I started learning Chinese, I was overly confident that I could learn it as fast as I learned other languages and I failed miserably. I tried out all my previous strategies and they failed one by one and I only came to realize that if I wanted to speak Chinese well, I'd have to let go of everything, learn it naturally by absorbing it and give it a lot of time.

      I suspect that this could go on and on every time I would learn a language from a completely different language family. Over confidence, which would lead to total disaster, dissapointment and loss in motivation. For me learning how to speak Chinese was really like learning how to speak and think as a different person all over again and so maybe if I was to start learning Japanese, I would use this approach to learn the language which might be my small advantage, since I'd know that all my strategies would be useless. But then again, Japanese is completely different and there might be many things that I could be learning much faster with more confidence and things that I should learn much slower because of too much drive. These things one can only know after he/she has learned the language so it's a long struggle any way you look at it.

      You said you need more things that you could find interesting about France and the French language, maybe you could try listening to French rap if you haven't done that already, if it's your thing of course:)

      all the best

      Vladimir

      Delete
  47. Hi Vladimir,
    Wow! that is so neat you can speak so many languages! I can't really give a credible "good job" because I don't really know any of the langauges you spoke except for English and a bit of German but there is no denying that you are great at langauges! It was inspiring to hear you speak them. I myself have recently been interested in learning German as I have several friends from Germany. And this desire to learn German has kinda spread. And I find lots of different languages fascinating. Keep it up! =) Gottes Segen

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you for the nice words and wish you the best with your German studies:)

      Delete
  48. Vladimir,
    It is so very impressive how well you speak all those languages and it really shows just how amazing and full of vast potential the human mind is.
    I’m a polyglot myself and I speak Russian, Hebrew, Spanish and Portuguese. However I prefer to speak Russian as it’s my favorite language. I have recently begun to study Cantonese and I think it will be very useful to me because I live in NYC and there are lots of people speaking that in our local Chinatowns. I can now tell the difference when someone is speaking Mandarin or Cantonese and in my opinion Cantonese sounds much nicer and it’s actually funny to listen to it LOL.
    As for my Russian, well I love to see the look on a Russian speaking person face when they discover I speak Russian because I don’t look like someone who should be able to speak it and they always have their mouth on the ground LOL.

    Я начал изучать русский язык 8 лет назад и сначала было очень трудно из-за произношения ,грамматики и кириллицей, но теперь я привык к нему и без проблем читаю и пишу на русском языке. Я сделал тест в Манхэттене, чтобы узнать, какой уровень я, потому что я сам научился на этом языке, и я действительно получил 88%, который считается высокий уровень, поэтому я был очень рад, если вы можете себе представить :) Я очень далеко, прежде чем я считаю себя свободно, но я надеюсь, чтобы достичь этого уровня в будущем. Это очень хорошо, что в Нью-Йорке есть очень много русских людей и русского магазинов, таких как Брайтон-Бич, например, так я всегда могу использовать мою Россию почти каждый день. Ну, я надеюсь, что смогу сделать так же, как и в изучении кантонском диалекте. Пожелайте мне удачи брат! :)

    *Кстати если у вас есть страница в Однокласнике, ищете меня: Вадим Хил
    и давай дружить. :)

    Хорошего вам дня!

    Вадим (мое русское имя) ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Dear Vadim,

      thank you very much for the nice words.

      When I started learning Mandarin, I thought Cantonese sounded much nicer than Mandarin and didn't understand why my Taiwanese friends used to tell me that it didn't sound very nice to their ears. About a month ago I heard a group of tourists from HongKong in Taiwan, which was the first time after a very long time since I heard Cantonese, and I have to say, that it didn't sound that nice anymore. This might be a nice topic for research actually:)

      I wish you the best of luck with Cantonese and would like to compliment you on your Russian writing skills. Great job and keep up the good work.

      best regards

      Vladimir

      Delete
  49. Great to see you're still learning languages, Vladimir. I've actually been thinking about your language learning a lot lately, as I've decided that I want to speak more than just Dutch, English and Spanish.

    Great recordig, really shows how far you can come if you set your mind to something!

    Ramses

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Hello dear Ramses,

      thank you for your comment.

      What language did you decide to learn?

      I've had about a one year break from language studies actually. I didn't have the motivation and I just couldn't learn for the sake of learning only. I'm started again though:)

      hope you're doing well

      Vladimir

      Delete
  50. Hallo Vladimir,

    wie geht's? Na, sehr beeindrückend deine Fähigkeiten mit Sprachen. Wie du, ich bin auch begeistert für Sprachen. Bisher hab' ich 8 Sprachen gelernt, aber ich kann 6 sprechen. Sehr interessant auch deinen Youtube-Kannal wo du über die Chinesischen Tonnen unterrichst. Bald werd' ich Chinesisch anfangen, es zu erlernen. Wenn du interessiert bist, dann können wir einen Tag auf Skype sprechen. Wenn so, hier ist mein ID:julcesaraval
    Ich hoffe wir können einen Tag ein Gespräch unterhalten und unsere Sprachen zu üben.
    Liebe Grüsse aus Mexiko, mein Freund!
    Tschüss
    Dein Julio

    ReplyDelete
  51. Lieber Julio,

    danke für den Kommentar.

    Ich habe Dir eine Freundeinladung per Skype geschickt. Der Zeitunterschied zwischen Taipei und Mexico sollte +14 Stunden sein.

    bis bald und liebe Grüsse

    Vladimir

    ReplyDelete
  52. Hi Vladimir. I found your posted recording on YouTube as I was looking for videos in Italian. I am very impressed with your linguistic talents and envy you very much. I am learning Italian, of course and also picking up Dutch.
    My native language is Malay and second langauge is English with a bit of Mandarin thrown in.
    Listening to your recording have given me more motivation to polish up my foreign language skills. I know I can do it!


    Merry Christmas and a Happy 2013 to you, from Brunei

    ReplyDelete
  53. Hello and thank you for the nice comment.

    You are the first person from Brunei that I ever spoke to:)

    I'm sure you'll do a wondeful job with Italian. You have a nice feel for sentence structure in English. How did you learn it?

    Merry Christmas and a happy New Year to you too.

    Vladimir

    ReplyDelete
  54. Hi Vladimir, thank you for the response. Back when I was in school, english was the teaching medium and it's still is here. I learned through reading, music and movies. Living in the UK for 3 years when I read my degree also helped me to be more conversant in english.

    I am taking the same approach for Italian - through books, and then music and movies for the pronounciations. As for Dutch, which I am learning in parallel, I practice with my Dutch colleagues in the office. Have you any suggestions how I can speed up my Italian and Dutch?

    M, Brunei

    ReplyDelete
  55. That explains why your English is so good.

    Reading is fantastic for vocabulary acquisition. If you like, you can write translations of the words you find important while you read in Italian or Dutch directly into the book you read on the same page where the unknown words are and then review every 5-10 pages.

    Music and movies are great, but unfortunately they do not contain as much spoken word as news or radio talkshows do. Try to look for those. I think I have a link to both Dutch and Italian news podcasts somewhere on my blog. I am not sure what your level of Italian and Dutch is, but if you have no one to talk to, you could try simultaneously stranslating movies, or the podcasts I mentioned into Malay. That is great practice. Once you get proficient enough, you can start simultaneously translating from Malay into Italian or Dutch.

    Vladimir

    ReplyDelete
  56. You know what? Your recording is like an adrenaline shot for my language studies. :)

    Good luck

    ReplyDelete
  57. :))

    Two days ago I've seen a video of a Korean girl speaking native-like English which totally put me to shame and boosted my terrible study morale as well.

    Let's hope we don't loose it:)

    Good luck to you too.

    ReplyDelete
  58. Thanks and I can relate :) I shoulda woulda coulda ignored the SAT practice tests, now I feel like a total sh*t after 6 years of study. Pero ahora mismo quiero estudiar para aprender espańol. No sé mucho todavía. Und mein Deutsch? I hope to revive it some day :)

    Hälsningar från Tjeckien.

    ReplyDelete
  59. Hi. I just wanted to post this link.

    http://annualglot.blogspot.cz/

    It's a blog of mine. So far there is only one article, but I thought it might be interesting to (proof)read.

    Take care

    ReplyDelete
  60. Hello Simon,

    welcome to the online blogging community.

    Your article was a nice read. What level are you aiming for in Spanish and what sort of a time frame did you set out for yourself? How about your Mandarin plans?

    wish you the best of luck

    Vladimir

    ReplyDelete
  61. Díky. Chtěl bych přesně za rok touto dobou mluvit plynně, ale samozřejmě pro mě to znamená co nejvíce se tomuto cíli přiblížit (v souladu s mojí prací a dalšími povinostmi). Poté budu buď pokračovat dál a nebo přiberu další jazyk (francouzštinu). Myslím, že když si člověk zvolí nějaký časový úsek pro svoje studium, tak ho to pak víc motivuje, než fádní "někdy se to naučím" :) Co se týče čínštiny, rozhodl jsem se jí odložit na dobu neurčitou, ale hodlám se k ní vrátit. Teď umím akorát pár vět, ale nejsem si jistý svou výslovností.

    Co ty? Čemu se teď věnuješ nejvíc?

    P.S. Mohl by si napsat nějakou zprávu na můj Skype účet (simon.rydvan) . Nějak si mi zmizel ze seznamu.

    P.P.S. Bohužel teď ale nemám sluchátka s mikrofonem a tak nemohu mluvit.

    Šťastný nový rok (teda pokud ho neslavíš až v únoru :)

    ReplyDelete
  62. Vyborne, congratulations, Hai veramente un talento per le lingue, sopratutto la pronuncia, I was impressed. Cesky vyborne r(pridej hacek), to ze jsi slovak slysim jen z tveho "l". En Espanol se te oye que has aprendido el idioma de los sudamericanos, verdad? Adesso ti manca solo il Greco da imparare, e' una lingua meravigliosa, te la consiglio! Would be nice to keep in touch as we share similar background and passions. Taky uz par let premyslim o tom udelat podobne video ale nejsem si jista ze je to dobry napad (ze stejnych duvodu ktere uvadis) a take kvuli praci (running private language tuition busines) Zajimal by mne tvuj nazor, and I hope to hear from you soon! Odkud ze Slovenka jsi? Ja mam rodinu v Levoci. ahoj, Alena (www.londonlanguagestudio.co.uk/our-tutors/about-alena-sunavska)

    ReplyDelete
  63. Ahoj Alena,

    dakujem pekne za komentar. Som z Kosic.

    S tym 'l' to je zaujimave :) Vobec by mi to nenapadlo, keby si to nespomenula. Musim sa popytat mojich kamaratov, kde je problem.

    Myslim, ze bez obav mozes urobit podobnu. Plno ludi uz tak urobilo, takze sa nemusis bat pripadnej negativity. A aj ked, nie je to az take strasne.

    Nerozmyslal som nad grectinou, ked mam pravdu povedat. Nemal som ani velmi ziadny dovod. Viem len par viet na zabavanie greckych turistov, to je vsetko. Ked, tak mozno starogrectinu, ale aj to len tak zlahka.

    Ak chces, tak mi posli email a mozme si zavolat cezs skype.

    Vsetko dobre

    Vlado

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  64. You have an amazing voice!:)

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  65. Are you learning Polish or Persian now?
    Man farsi mifahman, but the pronunciation seem a lot easier than the Arabic one, I may consider learning it in the future.

    Good luck

    ReplyDelete
  66. Hello,

    I'm learning both Polish and Farsi on and off, mostly off though:)

    Vladimir

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  67. Čau Vlado. To jsem já Šimon. Jen jsem se chtěl zeptat. Ty tvrdíš, že čínština má složitou gramatiku a že jsi s ní měl kolikrát problémy. Mohl by si uvést nějaké příklady? Spousta lidí tvrdí, že má čínština strašně jednoduchou gramatiku, ale většinou jí ti lidé nemluví a nejspíš tím myslí, že místo es, soy, fueron, haya sido atd. je tam jen jedno slovo a nijak se neohýbá.

    Jinak po dvou měsících španělštiny, musím říct, že to není vůbec složitý jazyk a zatím nevidím žádné větší překážky. Výslovnost je jednoduchá, gramatika je logická (konjunktiv v pohodě) atd.

    Díky za odpověď

    ReplyDelete
  68. Ahoj Simon,

    dik za spravu. To co chapeme pod pojmom gramatika, alebo tu cast, na ktoru sa my sustredime ked sa ucime zapadne jazyky (casovanie slovies, skolonovanie podstatnych mien atd) v cinstine ani velmi neexistuje, respektive existuje (mozes vyjadrit vsetky casy aj konjuktivy, presne tak ako v spanielcine, teda aspon myslim) ale je to znacne zjednodusene. Preto jasne, ze ked niekto, kto je zvyknuty ucit sa zapadne jazyky vidi cinsku 'gramatiku' prvy krat, tak si povie, ze je lahka, ale to je len preto ze pozera na tu cast, na ktoru je zvyknuty pozerat (casy, pady, sposoby atd.).

    Co je tazke na cinstine je, ze velmi tazko v nej hladat nejake 'patterns' (prepac za anglictinu ale nemam lepsi vyraz na to). Proste to vyzera ako by takmer kazda veta bola jedinecna, len zo zopar vymenitelnymi jednotkami (objekt, subjekt atd) a aj tam mozes dosadit naozaj len par konkretnych veci.

    Co sa tyka samotnej gramatiky, nespominam si teraz na vela prikladov, ale mne robia dost problemy dlhsie vety s viacerymi slovesami. tazko sa niekedy rozhodnut ci maju ist cez spojku alebo nie, ci maju mat objekt alebo mozu same ukoncit vetu, ci staci pouzit jednu slabiku slovesa alebo treba cele, atd.

    Dalej hrozne vela cinskych slov moze byt naraz podstatne meno, pridavne meno/prislovka a sloveso a niekedy si v tej rychlosti ani neuvedomis, ze moses pouzit rovno jedno sloveso namiesto sloveso+podstatne meno.

    Potom dost vela problemov robi spravne pouzivanie 就 alebo napriklad takmer vsetko co obsahuje 然: 當然, 雖然, 突然, 仍然, 居然, 竟然, 依然, hoci tie prve tri su pomerne jednoduche.

    Ked ide o konkretne priklady, nespominam si na vela takto z hlavy ale aspon zopar:

    Par jednoduchsich (tu ide len o detaily, presne to co by som ja z hlavy nedal):

    我很有耐心的
    那你都怎麼出門?
    白色衣服那個嗎?
    差太多了吧
    如果你有事要找我, 可以打給我
    我有點忘了

    Alebo tazsie:
    你是用你的文化來檢視我們的不同
    好想看房間 怎麼可以大到打籃球
    如果我考不好這個考試, 我要等到明年一月之後才可以畢業

    nejde ani tak o to, ze by boli zlozite, aj ked su, ale ide o to, maloktory zapadniar by ich z hlavy len tak zaimprovizoval len na zaklade znalosti cinskej gramatiky. Proste ti musi niekto povedat ako tu vetu povedat.. a tak cinstina trva roky, lebo musis narazit na tu situaciu a musi tam niekto byt kto ti povie, co povedat a musis si to este aj zapamatat.

    vsetko dobre

    Vlado

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  69. Haha thank you very much. And no need to be sorry for the English part since I encounter the same problem from time to time. For example the other day I wanted to ask my mom whether some food had been "off the limits" and I said "mimo dosah", but she took it literally so I had to think for a while before I asked: "Je na to uvalený embargo?" since that was probably the next best thing I could say. :)

    Take care

    Simon

    P.S. So I guess what you mean is that the hardest part is to sound like genuine Chinese speaker (imitate the mentality as well) which is what can be difficult in other languages as well (If you compare any American sitcom with what are many Czech high school teachers capable of) :) For example I wouldn't know how to translate "We Rodney King you." without too much explaining. Haha

    Thanks again

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  70. These are amazing recordings! My next venture is to learn Russian and I just started a short time ago. I will definitely apply your suggestions of trying to listen to at least 2 hours a day and speak as much as possible with natives. I know it must have been hard to organize your thoughts and upload these audio, but thanks for all of your hard work! I learned a few words also in Slovak like greetings, but learning still.

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  71. Dear Wally,

    thank you for the nice words. I'm glad you found my website useful.

    Wish you the best of luck with your studies.

    Vladimir

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  72. Soy yo Simon. Decidí a escribirte en espańol, porque creo que tenga suficiente de vocabulario y sin embargo cometo errores, no es posible sin los aprender un idioma. ?Puedes contestar en espańol, por favor?
    Quisiera preguntar si un ańo es suficiente tiempo para conseguir el "epiphany point". ?Hubo aprendido algun de tus idiomas en un áno?
    Estoy te preguntando porque me gustaría a aprender el francés el ańo entrante. Claro que no seré con fluidez en espańol en sólo un ańo, pero ?puedo conseguir un nivel B2-C1 o no?

    Gracias por tu respuesta

    Buena suerte

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  73. Hola Simon,

    claro que puedo responder en espanol. Por lo menos lo puedo provar:)

    La epifania es algo que depende de muchas cosas, entonces no puedo decir si un ano es suficiente o no. Si estaras en Espana, deberia ser mas que suficiente. Lo mismo vale para el B2-C1 frances.

    "Hubo aprendido algun de tus idiomas en un áno?"

    No estoy seguro si entiendo bien lo que quieres decir auqi. Quieres preguntarme si yo he jamas aprendido una de las lenguas que hablo en menos de un ano? Si, pero en el tiempo estaba viviendo en el pais donde se hablaba este idioma y tenia la motivacion correcta para estudiar.

    cuidate

    Vladimir

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  74. Sí, es precisamente lo que pregunté (o quise preguntar) y sí sería muy agradable si estuviera en Espańa o algún otro país dónde se habla el espańol, pero ahora mismo no es posible. Pero tengo la motivación para estudiarlo y sé qué esto va tomar un buen rato, pero mi primera meta es hablarlo y escribirlo sin mucho esfuerzo. Veremos :)

    A propósito también voy a leer El viejo y el mar, pero en castellano en lugar de italiano.

    Gracias por tu respuesta
    Simon

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  75. Hello!

    I'm from Poland.I'm 20 years old. I can speak russian, english, polish. I'm learning french and german. Do you think it is possile to become polyglott withoute having learned foreign language in childhood? Thnk you for response

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  76. Hello Adam.

    There are a lot of people who have become fluent in several languages without learning them in their childhood so it is perfectly possible.

    Wish you the best of luck with your studies.

    Vladimir

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  77. Čau Vlado. To jsem já Šimon na dlouhou dobu naposledy. Teď jsem tady skládal ten komentář a nakonec se to celý seklo. Tak znovu.
    Uvažoval jsem o té čínštině a máš pravdu, že bez "immersion" je to skoro nemožné. Mám menší zkušenost se semitonální švédštinou, kde je melodie také důležitá a lehce může dojít k nedorozumění.
    Prostě si myslím, že tady nějaká Pimsleur metoda nemá vůbec cenu. Snad mě boty někdy zavedou do Číny.

    "Hubo aprendido algun de tus idiomas en un áno?"

    Když se tak dívám na tu větu, tak si uvědomuji, že jsem popletl časy a navíc tento se už moc nepoužívá, ale "errar es experimentar". :) Pořád platí, že jsem si nastavil laťku na 1 rok, ale až toho bodu dosáhnu budu pokračovat dokud nebud mluvit plynule a rozumět tak 96% mluveného slova (teď myslím konkrétní případ, né všechen latinoamerický slang světa :D).

    P.S. Ještě jsem se chětl zeptat jestli je nějaký jazyk na který by sis netroufl nebo jestli máš nějakou zkušenost z minulosti? Já třeba nechápu jak se někdo dokáže naučit navažsky. Polysyntetický tónový jazyk: moje noční můra. :)

    P.P.S. Kdyby se tam náhodou objevil i ten první komentář, tak jeden smaž pro duplikaci.

    Měj se
    P.P.S. kdyby

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  78. Ahoj Simon,

    mas uplne pravdu s tou cinstinou. Bez pobytu v krajine sa proste nestihnes naucit tolko aby ta to zacalo naozaj bavit a malo to zmysel. Je toho prilis vela.

    Nerozmyslal som nad tym, ci by som si na nejaky jazyk netrufol.. myslim, ze asi nie. Ludia, ktori aj tym najkomplikovanejsim jazykom hovoria ako rodnym vobec nevedia ze je komplikovany a naucili sa ho bez problemov, takze podla mna je kazdy jazyk je naucitelny ale neviem, ci by som bol dost motivoavny ucit sa napr. Navajo len tak bez nejakeho ozajstneho dovodu.

    vsetko dobre a vela stastia so spanielcinou

    Vlado

    p.s.: komentar sa zobrazil len jeden.

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  79. Parabéns pelo esforço em falar Português! É uma língua muito complicada.. Se a parte falada já é difícil, a parte escrita é muito pior! Muitas regras de gramática, acentuação, conjugação de verbos, enfim... your accent is great though, Portuguese is so hard to pronounce perfectly if you're not from a Portuguese speaking country!
    I'm Brazilian and my grandparents are Italian so I had to learn Italian so I could talk to them. I learned English and Spanish at school and now I'm studying French! I know a little bit of Japanese, Korean and German, because I love doramas(Japanese and Korean soap operas) and German soap operas as well!! I know how to read and write Hangul, Hiragana, Katakana and around 450 kanji. It's not a lot but I can read some small and simple texts! I love learning new languages because I love to communicate with people! I find it amusing how easy it is to get access to material and information through the internet, it's a lot easier to learn this way!

    :) E mais uma vez, parabéns pelo esforço no Português! Tenho certeza que se você continuar treinando vai falar muito bem!!

    Guilherme.

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  80. Hello Guilherme,

    thank you for the comment. Great collection of languages you are interested in:) Wish you the best of luck in your studies.

    Vladimir

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  81. Salut, Vladi!
    Ich muss sagen, ich mag deine Stimme sehr gerne. So sexy, besonders wenn du Russisch, Tschechisch, und Slowakisch sprichst.

    Diese drei Sprachen interessieren mich auch und ich werde sie (oder eine von denen) lernen. Ich sollte aber warten bis meine französische und schwedische Sprachen in einer 'sichereren' Zone sind.

    Russischkurs ist zum Glück angeboten wo ich wohne (in Jakarta, Indonesien). Und das auch mit Muttersprachlern als Lehrer. Leider gibt es, oder genauer gesagt, kenne ich kein Mensch, die mir bei Tschechisch und Slowakisch helfen könnte. Diese zwei hätte ich lernen sollen als ich in Deutschland lebte. :'(

    Ich war schon mal in Prag, aber (noch mal) Leider nich nie irgendwo in Slowakei. Eines Tages hoffentlich.

    Lebst du noch in Taiwan? Komm doch mal nach Jakarta zu Besuch. Oder Bali/Lombok. Das ist nicht so weit von Taiwan. :-)

    Noch mal, tolle Podcast. Du brauchst aber nicht 'camera-shy' zu sein. :-)


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  82. Liebe Kalisa,

    vielen dank fuer die netten Worte.

    Wie lange hast du Deutsch gelernt? Wenn es nicht deine Muttersprache ist, sprichst/schreibst du es sehr gut. Ich allein sollte eigentlich in Englisch antworten, weil mein Deutsch nicht mehr das ist wass es vorher gewesen war:( Zur Zeit beschaeftige ich mich leider nicht mit Fremdsprachen so viel.

    Warum moechtest du genau diese drei slawischen Sprachen lernen? Wuerde mich ziemlich interessieren.

    Ich wohne noch immer in Taiwan, bin noch nie in Jakarta oder Bali gewesen und wuerde sehr gerne eines Tages dahin fahren:)

    Liebe Gruesse

    Vladimir

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  83. Lieber Vlad,
    meine Muttersprache ist Indonesisch. Ich habe aber schon seit elf Jahren Deutsch gelernt und lebte für kurze Zeit in DE. Natürlich kannst du mir gerne im Englischen beantworten. Or I'm just gonna switch to English.
    Usually, it's my ears who 'decide' which language(s) I wanna know/learn. Of all the Slavic languages, I have only heard/listened to Russian, Ukrainian, Polish, Bulgarian, Czech, and Slovak. They all sound cool, tough, and unique. (Probably) because few people to none speak them in Indonesia. Russian though, has become more popular here and 'everyone' wants to learn it. It's good to be able to read War & Peace or Anna Karenina in Russian. :)
    I keep my list of the language(s) I want to learn updated. There might be some changes over time. It's not a list that I wrote/typed on a piece of paper. It's just in my head. 10-15 years ago, I wouldn't be interested in learning Russian or any other languages of Central/Eastern European countries. I preferred Dutch, German, Spanish, Italian, and/or French. I did learn French in high school. I did not take it seriously though. I skipped classes a lot because the teacher was getting too boring. I started to learn French again in 2009.
    Ahoj, the Czech/Slovak word for 'Hello' (?) is already stuck in my head because it reminds me of my favourite cookies: Chips Ahoy. And there's also 'dva/dve' that looks similar to Indonesian 'dua' with the same meaning 'two'.
    I love languages in general. If I could, I would learn them all that I'm interested in. But that would seem (almost) impossible. I think all language geeks/lovers/enthusiasts can relate to this.
    I've also been intrigued by Japanese. It's one of the languages I was exposed to as a kid apart from Indonesian, English, and Javanese (one of the local languages in Indonesia). I really love how Japanese sounds. Japan is culturally and historically interesting and related to Indonesia.
    I grew up watching a lot of Japanese superheroes TV series. (Almost) everyday after school. I could even sing the theme songs in Japanese (text-free) even though I did not understand what it was all about.
    Now, I don't speak/write Japanese at all and really want to learn it. Someone 'introduced' me to 'japaneseformoron' on YouTube. Do you know this guy?
    I've recommended your blog to a friend of mine who is currently living in Beijing to learn Mandarin (I don't know if the Mandarin there is the same as in Taiwan) and something culinary. He is an Indonesian of Chinese descent but doesn't speak the language. Hopefully he's not too busy chasing girls and would be inspired by you on how to win the World War 3 over Mandarin Chinese instead.
    I personally don't have any plan on learning Mandarin. At least not now. But your story is some kind of 'warning sign' to me that one should be careful and be patient when learning languages that is (completely) different from his/her mother tongue and/or the languages he/she learnt before. In my case, Japanese and Slavic languages. For example.
    There are two songs in Mandarin that I might never get tired of listening even though I don't understand the lyrics which are Ni Yao De Ai (Penny Tai) and Qing Fei De Yi (Harlem Yu). Both are the theme songs of Meteor Garden, a Taiwanese TV series which was very popular in the early 2000s. Ever heard of it?
    You seem to be enjoying Taiwan so much. Don't you miss home?
    Last but not least, I hope you'll soon find yourself motivated again to learn languages. And, sorry for writing too long. :-)
    Liebe Grüsse,
    KH

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  84. Duzhe Dyakuyu! Merci beaucoup!

    That was great!

    You should try Ukrainian!! It's an absolutely beautiful language-along with an incredible culture. Almost half of the vocabulary of Ukrianian is the same with Russian. You can look up this band that sings in Ukrainian called: Один в Каное

    Keep it up!

    Props from Canada!

    ReplyDelete
  85. Dear Kalisa,

    thank you for the nice comment and I'm sorry for replying a little too late.

    Thank you for recommending my blog to your friend too:) Hope he will find it at least somewhat helpful.

    Now I'm interested. Why is Russian getting popular in Indonesia?

    I have never heard of Meteor Garden:) I seldom watch TV, only the news and I stopped watching that too. The only TV show that I watched in Taiwan (but didn't finish it) was Black and White. Did you ever hear about it?

    Learning languages is a difficult thing to do and without motivation, as everything else, it is even harder. My motivation is changing like the weather in Taipei, so maybe I will give Japanese a shot in the near future..or not:) I actually don't like to learn foreign languages that much, I like to be able to speak a foreign language the sooner the better:)

    Wish you a nice day and hope to talk to you in Russian or another Slavic language soon

    Vladimir

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  86. Dear Joseph,

    thank thank you for you comment:)

    I have heard spoken Ukrainian only once, listening to a news report. As many of these 'you think you understand, but don't quite understand' languages, it was very interesting to listen to. I remember hearing some Slovak words that are rarely used in Slovak nowadays in that Ukrainian news report, but it was a while ago, so I don't remember that much to be honest. I remember that the word ambassador in Ukrainian was interesting for some reason. But I don't remember how to say it:)

    have a nice day

    Vladimir

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  87. Čau Vlado,

    jen jsem si tak prohlížel některé znaky a napadlo mě jestli sis v průběhu jejich studia dělal nějaké mnemotechnické pomůcky?

    煙 - cigareta

    "Nějakej chlápek dostal od krále ze západu tabák." :D Nebo tak něco. :D

    Šimon

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  88. Are you planning an updated recording with Polish, Romanian, Farsi and Hokkien?

    Michael

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  89. Simone ahoj:)

    na zaciatku som si robil hrozne vela memotechnickych pomocok, ale potom som sa v nich uz zacal stracat. Bolo ich treba hrozne hrozne vela na zapamatanie jedneho znaku, popripade pinyin, vyslovnost a tony.

    Mne sa to velmi neosvecilo.

    Vlado

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  90. Hello Michael,

    I was planning to record a dialogue with my Polish friend as well as a dialogue in Farsi with my Iranian friend to have a reference for myself for the future but then I stopped having motivation to learn, so I didn't do it.

    I also wanted to record an introduction in Hokkien, but didn't feel motivated to learn more, so I didn't do that either.

    Hopefully later:)

    all the best

    Vladimir

    ReplyDelete
  91. Marvelous stuff; I wish I could do this. Nonetheless, one has to ask (especially since your English is so good)... are you *really* Slovakian, and if so, WHY ARE YOU NOT PLAYING PROFESSIONAL HOCKEY? :(

    Other languages you might try learning include Canadian, and of course, Obama's favorite, Austrian.

    Interesting that you've included Hungarian but passed over that other peculiar Finno-Ugric up north... the one with all the vowels.

    Seriously... congrats to you. This was excellent.

    ReplyDelete
  92. Hello:)

    thank you for the nice comment.

    I am really Slovak:) I lived most of my life in Slovakia too. I've learned English in the US when I was very young, so that's probably the reason I still sound somewhat American. I don't play hockey, probably because there was no stadium close to where I lived, but I like to watch the game every now and then. I speak Hungarian, because I went to a Hungarian kindergarten instead of a Slovak one and I don't think I'd learn or be able to speak this language otherwise.

    The recording is relatively old too and some of my languages from the recording are a bit rusty now. Chinese and English I speak a bit better though:) I've been learning some new languages too (Farsi, Polish, Hokkien, Japanese) but I'm far from fluent.

    thanks again for the nice words

    Vladimir

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  93. Absolutely amazing....congratulations on your success with polyglotty.....I have always wanted to try something like this, but with very little luck. At the moment, I speak English naturally, Spanish extremely well, Portuguese fairly well, and pieces and fragments of German, Russian, Swedish, and Hungarian, but with little success. If only some of us were as blessed as you! :D

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  94. Hello Zack:)

    thank you for the nice comment. There are a lot other people in the online polyglot community with similar recordings, you can check them out if you like. Maybe you know a lot of them already:)

    Why have you decided to learn Hungarian?

    all the best

    Vladimir

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  95. Hi Vladimir Skultety
    How are you?
    Excellent Job ! My dream is to become a polyglot .I'm Brazilian and a Like learning languages.its Kind a hobby of mine. I really enjoy leraning languages. Now im learning German . I speak english too, not so well but, i try to make it clean .I know a little Russian too. Your portuguese is good, i understood everything u sad !

    Thanks for the video,it inspired me to keep learning languages! post more videos, keep it up!
    See ya Bro

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  96. Hello Douglas,

    thank you for the nice words. I can only understand Portuguese, not speak it. I tried my best, but made a mess out of it. I was a bit tired towards the end of the recording so that influenced it a bit too, but I don't think I could do much better, had I not been tired at all.

    Take care and wish you the best in your studies :)

    Vladimir

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  97. Hi, I am Portuguese. I have an advice for you: try to learn European Portuguese (from Portugal) before learning Brazilian. Why? Because once you learn European Portuguese you'll be able to understand not only Brazilian but also the Portuguese variaties from Africa and Asia. But, if you start with Brazilian, you'll have some difficulties in understanding other kinds of Portuguese. It's just a question of accent.

    I know it's hard, but you learned Chinese! So...

    ReplyDelete
  98. Hello,

    thank you for your comment.

    When it comes to Portuguese, I have been attracted to this language by listening to some songs from Brazil as a child and having several friends from there so it is more natural to choose to study the Brazilian version. I have nothing against Portuguese from Portugal, it's just that I am more motivated to study the Brazilian version.

    It makes sense what you say, that after studying the European version, I will be able to understand all other versions more easily, but then again it would be harder for me to study the Portuguese version itself, just because I would not be motivated enough.

    all the best

    Vladimir

    ReplyDelete
  99. Cau Vlado

    Velmi zaujimavy blog. Co sa mi ale najviac paci su komentare a to ze sa v nich pise viacerymi jazykmi a ze vies odpovedat v roznej forme a zda sa ze vedomost jazykov u teba je na trochu vyssej urovni. Ako vacsina slovakov aj ja rozumiem cesky a velmi rad citam knihy v cestine avsak pisat po cesky by bol pre mna asi problem. Kedze som vyrastol v podstate na polskych hraniciach tak rozumiem polsky a viem aj cosi povedat ale s citanim uz mam problem a pisat by som si netrufol. Takze fakt impressive a priznam ze ti trochu zavidim :). Taktiez sa zda ze aj ked je tento clanok starsi tak stale zaujme ;).

    Tiez som nedavno zacal studovat Cinstinu ale ucim sa momentalne len rozpravat a pocuvat. Priznam zo znakov mam trochu strach. Ale u mna v cudzich jazykoch je dolezite dorozumiet sa na zvysok bude cas neskor ak to bude potrebne :D. Teraz ma uci rodeny taiwanec cez skype ale uvazujem o studiu priamo na Taiwane tak som sa vlastne dostal aj k tvojmu blogu. Je super vediet ze to uz niekto zvladol predo mnou a este lepsie precitat si cosi zo skusenosti tych co tym uz presli a trochu sa povzbudit.

    Drzim palce nech sa ti dari v uceni aj pouzivani jazykov ;)

    Michal

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  100. Ahoj Miso,

    dakujem pekne za povzbudivy komentar.

    Veru ma ta nahravka uz par dni:) Neviem ako by som obstal, keby som ju mal urobit teraz. Tu na Taiwane nestretavam vela cudzincov a tak vela zabudam. Dohodnut si s niekym stretnutie na internete len na to aby som si cvicil nejaky cudzi jazyk ma zase nebavi. Cinstina mi ide nastastie lepsie:)

    Tiez si myslim, ze znaky su na zaciatku zbytocna zataz. Cinstina je hrozne tazka tak ako je, tie znaky tomu velmi nepomahaju, ale ked budes chciet plnohodnotne fungovat v spolocnosti, budes sa ich podla mna skor ci neskor musiet aj tak naucit. Na druhej strane ich nie je 'az tak' vela a vacsi problem je s tym nekonecnym mnozstvom slov, zvratov, slovnych spojeni a vetnych konstrukcii (ked uz hovorime o mnozstve ako o probleme).

    prajem vela stastia a uspechov :)

    maj sa pekne

    Vlado

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  101. Hi, Vladimir! I want to ask you a question about your Russian. You say that the best way for a Slavic person to learn this language is by listening to audio. My quistion is - if I simply do this, without bothering myself with grammar, could it be possible to reach a good level? Did you learn Russian grammar or simply managed to reach this level with audio and spending a month in Russia? Thank you!

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  102. Hello and thank you for your comment.

    I forgot to mention it in the recording but I did do a little bit of grammar actually. I remember I worked with Russian conjugation and declension tables to see what exactly was different from Slovak and try to remember it.

    I recorded a podcast a long time ago about how I learned Russian. You can find it here if you like:

    http://www.foreverastudent.com/2011/01/learning-simple-language.html

    all the best and good luck with your studies

    Vladimir

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  103. Čau Vlado. To jsem já Šimon. Nevím, jestli si na mě ještě pamatuješ, ale měl bych dva dotazy a byl bych rád, pokud bys mi mohl poradit.

    1) V budoucnu bych se rád naučil čínsky a to tchaj-wanský dialekt včetně tradičních znaků. Zajímalo by mě, jak dobře rozumíš lidem z Pekingu, Šanghaje apod. Mám kamaráda, jehož mateřštinou je ťchingtchienština (qingtianhua - WU) a také mluví plynně wenčousky (wenzhouhua - WU) a mandarínsky. V současné době bydlí v Pekingu a ptal jsem se ho jak moc rozumí lidem z S-čchuanu a Tchaj-wanu. Napsal mi, že jde pouze o sílu zvyku, ale rád bych slyšel i tvůj názor, jako ne-rodilého mluvčího čínštiny.

    2. dotaz se týká výslovnosti. To jak Tchaj-wanci vyslovují zh jako z, sh jako s apod. je spisovná čínština, nebo hovorová čínštiná ovlivněná dialektem min nan?

    Šimon

    Měj se... :)

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  104. Nazdar Simone,

    jasne, ze pamatam:)

    K tvojim otazkam:

    1) Pokial ludia z Pekingu a ludia z Taiwanu rozpravaju pekne a spisovne, tak ako maju, tak je medzi nimi uplne minimalny rozdiel, povedal by som ze ovela mensi ako medzi britskou a americkou anglictinou a ja osobne obom velmi dobre rozumiem. Pocuvam kazdy den spravy, kde moderatori su z Ciny a rozdiel vidim hlavne vo volbe niektorych slov, ktorych je ale hrozne malo v pomere k celemu jazyku (asi tak 5 co som si vsimol). To iste si myslim plati pre Taiwancov. Ak hovoria naozaj spisovne a poctivo rozlisuju 'zh' od 'z' atd tak je rozdiel naozaj len v prizvuku. A to si este myslim, ze ked hovoria naozaj velmi poctivo, tak aj ten rozdiel je minimalny.

    Ked ale obaja hovoria so silnym prizvukom, tak to moze byt na zaciatku problem podla mna. Asi ako niekto so silnym skotkskym prizvukom proti niekomu so silnym juzanskym prizvukom z USA. Niekedy robia v spravach rozhovory s ludmi v Cine na ulici a im rozumiem horsie.

    2) To ako Taiwanci vyslovuju zh/z je podla mna ovplyvnene Minnan dialektom, ale aj lenivostou. Vela Taiwancov neovlada Minnan skoro vobec a velmi dobre vedia ako sa co spisovne vyslovuje, lebo by to nevedeli napisat na pocitaci. Proste je namahave dat jazyk do 'zh' pozicie a tak ho drzia v pozicii 'z' okolo ktorej je aj vela dalzich spoluhlasok, a tak je to ovela pohodlnejsie. Navyse vsetci okolo tak hovoria, tak je naozaj neprirodzene vyslovovat 'z' ako zh'. Vela zapadniarov to vedome kopiruje, lebo chcu zniet 'taiwansky' ale neuvedomuju si jednu velku chybu ktoru robia a to je ta, ze samohlaska ktora nasleduje za 'zh' je ina ako ta co nasleduje za 'z'. Taiwanci menia len 'zh' na 'z' ale zapadniari menia cele 'zhi' na 'zi' co je blbost a taiwanci im potom casto nerozumeju.

    Maj sa pekne a drzim palce

    Vlado

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  105. Hello:) Thank you for the nice words. Wish you the best with your studies.

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  106. Wow, I'm simply amazed! I'm bilingual (korean + english with korean as my native language) and I've always thought speaking 2 languages is difficult enough but look at you... You really are talented and have amazing language skills! I wish I understood more languages though because I was kinda lost in the middle because I wasn't sure which language you were speaking in, particularly Hungarian and Portugese. Must be because I'm not familiar with the sounds of these languages. Anyway that's besides the point. I really enjoyed this recording :)

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  107. Hello and thank you for the nice words:) Actually I wanted to learn Korean for a very long time too, but because I know it's very difficult and because I would like to speak it well and know it would take me forever to learn, I never found the motivation.

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  108. Ciao Vladimir,
    É un po' che ti seguo su internet e devo dire che trovo il tuo blog e i tuoi consigli molto utili inoltre mi piace e condivido la tua " language learning philosophy ". Tra tutti i poliglotti su internet ,sei sicuramente uno dei migliori. Io mi definisco un simpatizzante della comunity e sono io stesso un appassionato di lingue. Sono cresciuto completamente monolingua, ma ho cercato di porre rimedio a questo crecando di imparare inglese e tedesco con qualche risultato decente. Invidio un pò persone come te che hanno avuto la possibilitá di crescere tra piú lingue :-).
    Se volessi rispolverare un po' il tuo italiano, sarei contento di darti una mano su Skype.

    Alberto

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  109. Ciao Alberto,

    Ti ho risposto subito il 27 Maggio, nel giorno, in cui avevi scritto questo messaggio, ma solo adesso mi sono reso conto che la mia risposta non e mai apparsa tra i commentari!

    Mi dispiace tantissimo! Cerco di rispondere a tutti i messaggi e commentari che ricevo, e mi dispiace davvero quando succede una cosa del genere. Spero che tu non sia rimasto male.

    Grazie mille per le Tue parole. Infatti, sarei felice, se potessi praticare il mio Italiano, che oramai davvero e lontano da quello che una volta era :)

    Se Ti va bene, mandami un messaggio e ci mettiamo in contatto.

    Con saluti cordiali,

    Vladimir

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  110. i am trying to translate your transcript to the languages i am prone to . Thank you and good job!

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